Colorado River Delta

Your Evening News - December 12th, 2014

Dec 12, 2014

Fracking Fluids Study

Scientists are trying to learn a lot more about effects of oil and gas drilling and a new report is looking chiefly at fracking fluids.

Researchers with Colorado State University looked at the most toxic chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing. Scientists reviewed all the existing research to see how those chemicals travel in the natural environment, how long they last, and whether they post a risk to human health. They found that most of the more toxic chemicals are also used in other industrial and commercial work. More than half are particularly dangerous to humans, or could be over time. And they’re most likely to pollute the environment during surface spills.

Scientists also came up with recommendations for urgently needed research. One example is what happens to the chemicals when they’re injected deep into the ground.

Your Morning News - December 12th, 2014

Dec 12, 2014

Parking Scam Investigation Nets Big Numbers, Many Cards

More than 4,000 debit cards were used in a massive Aspen parking fraud scheme between September 2013 and November 2014. Aspen’s Police Department has released an update on the case. According to a credit card processing company, nearly 200 of the cards had more than a $1,000 worth of charges used to get free parking in downtown Aspen. Police Spokeswoman Blair Weyer says investigators are using the new information to pinpoint who was gaming the system.

High water on the Crystal River has forced the Gunnison County Sheriff’s office to call off a search for a missing kayaker.

Rivers in the Valley are dangerously high. One stretch of the Colorado River is too full to float, so a commercial rafting company changed its route.

A local photographer is back from the Colorado River Delta, where he witnessed the Colorado River reconnect to the sea.

Jimmy Carter and Amory Lovins are a few guests set to speak at this summer’s American Renewable Energy Day in Aspen - we’ll have a preview.

And, more than a dozen new art sculptures were installed on Carbondale’s busy streets this week.

Finally, we’ll take you to Hunter S. Thompson’s old homestead for a cookout hosted by a marijuana advocacy group.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Pete McBride

Last month the Colorado River met the sea for the first time in about two decades thanks to what’s called a “pulse flow.” Local photographer and filmmaker Pete McBride was there to see it. He was taking photos for an upcoming article in Outside Magazine. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with him this week, about the experience.