Colorado River Water Conservation District

Colorado is one of the only states in the country where it is illegal to collect the rain that falls on your roof.

Earlier this year, a bipartisan measure to allow rain barrels failed on the last day of the legislative session.

Jerry Sonnenberg (R – Sterling) opposed the bill, but now he’s proposing a new measure to allow rain barrels if providers make up for the water that would have gone into rivers and streams.

“My argument is that there is actually an impact,” says Sonnenberg. “ We have to recognize there is an impact. We have a prior appropriation system.”

Creative Commons/Flickr/TheBoyFromFindlay

The Garfield County Commissioners are working to send a powerful message that they’re against new transmountain diversions. 

The commissioners are organizing a meeting of Western Slope elected leaders to draw up a unified message ahead of the completion of Governor Hickenlooper’s statewide water plan. Garfield County Commissioner Tom Jankovsky:

Peter McBride

The Colorado River is expected to reconnect with the sea today, for the first time in several years. Two months ago, water officials sent water down the expansive delta to improve habitat. The last stretch of the river has been dry for decades thanks to overuse. It’s used to supply drinking water, irrigate farmlands and generate power. In 2011, photojournalist and Basalt resident Pete McBride documented the dry delta in his film Chasing Water.

Marci Krivonen

Water managers, users, and other decision makers from across Colorado are meeting today in Keystone. It’s part of ongoing efforts to make sure water’s being used in a smart way across the state. And now officials are starting to put together a statewide water plan, as ordered by Governor John Hickenlooper. John Stulp is the governor’s water advisor--and he’s overseeing Wednesday's meeting.

Colorado River Water Conservation District

Water officials are laying out a plan for meeting the growing demands of the Colorado River in the future. The group met yesterday in California. The meeting was prompted by a study out last year. It predicts looming shortages on the River, which supplies water to 40 million people, as well as farmers and ranchers in Western states. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.