Community Development

Officials in the mid valley are continuing to look at a major development proposal near Whole Foods. The controversial Tree Farm plan could mean as many as 400 hundred residential units and more than a 130,000 square feet in commercial development. But if the property was a few football field lengths to the southeast, it would go through a whole different set of requirements.

 

Carolyn Sackariason

If a governmental entity wants to build in Aspen's city limits, they have to get a review in 60 days. But that fast track does not apply to building projects by the City of Aspen. Confused? Aspen Public Radio's Elise Thatcher explains.

Aspen City Council is getting up to speed on a time limit for how long the municipal government has to review government development projects. The city's planning department is recommending Aspen follow a mandatory 60 day time limit for ruling on a municipal development proposal. That's according to state law.

Aspen City Council decided last night [Monday] to hold off for a while on changing the town’s land use code. The ordinance was drafted in response to a ballot measure calling for more oversight of development approvals. Council had come up with their own land use changes to address the same community concerns about out-of-control development. The majority of public comments Monday were against council’s ordinance or raised questions about it.

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journalism

A loophole in Pitkin County’s land-use code allowed a huge wedding on the backside of Aspen mountain last weekend. The size of the ceremony angered area residents. Now, Pitkin County Commissioners are scrambling to close the loophole.  How they plan to do that is still up in the air. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen attended their meeting yesterday and filed this report.