Crime

Valley Roundup - March 7th, 2014

Mar 7, 2014

Joining us today are Carolyn Sackariason of the Aspen Daily News, Michael Miracle of Aspen Sojourner magazine and Andy Stone of the Aspen Times.

This week, the community processes the murder of a lifetime local.  Homicide is rare here and it is especially difficult when the victim is so well know.

Also this week, Aspen Valley Hospital parts ways with a longtime surgeon and signs up with a new surgical team.

And, a new Limelight in Snowmass is off the table…maybe.

One of NPR’s top international correspondents visited the valley this week.  Phillip Reeves gave audiences the backstory to Ukraine, Russia and Crimea.  Reeves sat down for interview with us and you’ll hear it just ahead on this week’s Valley Roundup.

Aspen Police Department

Aspen authorities are asking the public to look over a video...that may aid in a fraud case. On January 20th police discovered a “skimmer” on an ATM at the Wells Fargo Bank in Aspen. Thieves use such a device to read data strips on bank cards. A small camera was also attached to the ATM to record people punching in their ID numbers. That camera could lead authorities to a suspect.

A bipartisan committee at the statehouse has moved forward a bill to make it easier to remove people’s mug shots from commercial websites if they were never convicted of the crime for which they were arrested.

Indian Law and Order Commission

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is often associated with veterans, and hundreds of thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan combat vets have been diagnosed. But another group of people in the US with an even higher rate of PTSD… and they have never been to a foreign war zone. That’s according to out November 2013 by a presidential commission.

James Startt

Making a death threat against someone in another state gets serious attention from federal law enforcement. Two passionate Lance Armstrong fans recently plead guilty to threatening one of the top people investigating whether the iconic athlete doped. One was Utah resident Robert Hutchins, who will be sentenced in February in Denver. He faces up to five years in jail and a maximum $250,000 fine. In a separate case, Florida resident and doctor Gerrit Kuechle Keats plead guilty to similar threatening charges earlier this fall.

Farther down valley, the Basalt Police Department is still trying to reach someone who may have been one of the last people to see a man who died in Basalt last month. Daniel Perez Mejia was found in late May in a ditch near Big O Tires in Basalt. Police say Mejia got off a bus operated by the Roaring Fork Transit Authority late in the evening on Saturday, May 25th. There was another man who got off the bus at the same time.

211 Crew in the Valley

Apr 11, 2013
Photo from the Institute for the Study of Violent Groups

The murder of Colorado’s head of corrections last month is being blamed on a member of the white supremacist prison gang known as the 211 Crew.  Police killed the suspect but a manhunt continues for another 211 member who remains at large and might be involved.  The gang was formed in the Denver County Jail in the 1990’s and since then some of it’s members have found their way to the Roaring Fork Valley. Aspen Public Radio's Roger Adams reports.

Photo from Aspen Police Department

Investigators are still trying to figure out what happened at several Aspen ATMs in late March. The criminals withdrew thousands of dollars with fake debit and credit cards. But the big question remains... how were they able to make the cards in the first place? Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this report.

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