The show is about The Aspen Challenge at Denver Public Schools with Natalie Travers, Program Manager of the Aspen Challenge, Will Palmquist, a junior at East High School in Denver, and Solicia Lopez, the Student Board Director at Denver Public Schools.

It’s election time and we’re taking a look at issues on the November ballot and what they could mean for a voter’s tax bill. First, there’s a statewide income tax increase for public schools.

And, there’s a local proposal to build a rec center in the Mid-Valley. Supporters say will enhance the community, while critics say it would mean hundreds more in property taxes for homeowners.

Basalt residents are being asked to redevelop land along the Roaring Fork River. The plan forces out more than a hundred people from a trailer park.

Finally, we’ll hear the latest weather forecast for the coming winter… there’s good news, and bad news.

The government shutdown trudges on but Pitkin County is working to alleviate the pain by increasing access to a local attraction on federal land.

A proposal for funding public education has been called historic by Colorado’s governor. But, the ballot measure could stretch wallets.

The Aspen Skiing Company hopes to catch the eye of up and coming skiers from certain Asian countries.

And, changes may be in store if the USA Pro Challenge bike race returns to the upper Roaring Fork Valley next year. We talk with an economist who says big sporting events may not mean more money for the towns hosting them.

Finally, we get an update on local athletes training for the upcoming Winter Olympics in Russia.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Univers beeldbank

This week, Governor John Hickenlooper enthusiastically supported Amendment 66, calling it the single most important education reform initiative in the history of the United States. School districts in the Roaring Fork Valley are also weighing in on the measure.  Hyperbole aside, the amendment would change the way the state funds public schools. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, school administrators aren’t the only groups sharing opinions before voters head to the polls in November.

The Roaring Fork School District's Visioning Process with Dr. Diana Sirko, Superintendent of Schools and Dr. Rob Stein, Assistant Superintendent and Chief Academic Officer.

Kitty Boone of the Aspen Institute with Dr. Kathy Klug on this year's Western Slope College Fair, Sunday October 6th.

More about the fair at:

Al Cunningham and Richard DeCampo of the Haiti School Project. Also an update from Haiti School Project co-founder Tim Myers from Haiti.

More on the project:

@millie_hamner (Twitter)


The latest legislative session in Denver was the first Lawmaker Millie Hamner spent representing Pitkin County. It was the democratic representative’s second term, but a redraw of legislative maps in 2011, broadened her district to include Pitkin County. A former superintendent of schools, she now chairs the education committee at the Statehouse. Her most controversial bill this session centered on funding for k-12 education. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with her about it shortly after the session ended on May 8th.



Adam Frankel is founding executive director of Digital Promise, a bipartisan, public-private partnershipchartered by Congress to spur innovation in education. Frankel was special assistant to the president and senior speechwriter for President Obama after speechwriting on Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign.

Must Do: Read Well By Third Grade

May 19, 2013
Roger Adams

A recent study shows that 40 percent of Colorado high school graduates who go on to college need remedial help with at least one subject.  This high number may in part be the result of problems the kids had as far back as first and second grade.  A major factor, educators believe, is a lack of adequate early literacy.  As Aspen Public Radio’s Roger Adams explains, reading skills must be acquired at a very young age.