Election

Aspen confirms enough signatures for vote on Base 2

Aug 3, 2015
Elise Thatcher

  It’s now more likely that Aspenites will decide the future of a lodge on Main Street. Aspen City Clerk Linda Manning says there are more than enough valid signatures to have a ballot measure in the fall. Petition organizers want Aspen residents to decide whether to allow the “Base 2” project.

Facebook/GrassRoots TV

The two candidates squaring off for a seat on Aspen city council think change needs to happen in the city department that handles development proposals. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more from Thursday night’s “Squirm Night” forum.

The City’s community development department is made up of more than two dozen staffers. It handles construction plans and ensures developments comply with the city’s building code. It also enforces the land use code.

Roger Adams

Steve Skadron is hoping to hang on to the mayor’s seat in Aspen. He has one challenger in the May election but says his proven leadership will earn him votes. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Skadron has served two terms on council. This would be his second term as mayor. He runs a marketing business and has lived in town for two decades. He says he’s pursuing re-election as a commitment to public service.

Roger Adams

The race for mayor in Aspen has become more heated as election day gets closer. Two people are running for the seat. Ballots will be counted May 5th. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen sat down with candidate Torre.

Torre isn’t a newcomer to city politics. He served eight years on council. This is his fifth attempt to become mayor. The tennis instructor has lived in town for two decades and says he’s running because he feels the public’s voice has been lost.

Creative Commons/401kcalculator.org

The candidates running in Aspen’s spring election are already raising thousands of dollars in the race for elected office. The first of three campaign finance reports was filed Tuesday.

Campaign against Referendum 1 takes shape

Apr 10, 2015
aspenvoteknow.com

A campaign against Aspen Referendum 1 is beginning to take shape. The Aspen Chamber Resort Association says it’s part of a coalition of organizations aiming to convince residents to vote against the ballot question. If passed, it would amend the City Charter to require a public vote on development projects with exceptions for height, size, parking, or affordable housing.

Myrin defends actions at ACRA forum

Apr 9, 2015
Elise Thatcher

Last night, Aspen City Council candidate Bert Myrin defended altering opposing campaign materials ten years ago, to benefit a political cause. The issue came up during the Aspen Chamber Resort Association candidate forum.

Roger Adams

Former Aspen Mayor Mick Ireland is in familiar territory. He’s out campaigning for office like he’s done several times before. This time, Ireland is hoping to fill one of two open seats on city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Ireland served as a Pitkin County Commissioner for 13 years and mayor for six. He grew up in a family of public servants, he says.

Davis, Trauger win Glenwood Council seats

Apr 7, 2015
Creative Commons/Flickr/Vox Efx

Glenwood Springs residents have chosen new city council members and decided on a ballot question. Steve Davis won the council seat for Ward 1, which covers the western section of Glenwood Springs. Kathryn Trauger won the At Large seat.

Marci Krivonen

We continue our series profiling the candidates running for Aspen City Council. Seven people are vying for two open seats. Candidate Marcia Goshorn is frustrated with city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains why.

Goshorn has lived in Aspen for nearly four decades. She first visited in 1960. Now she runs a property management company and keeps a close eye on city hall. She says council isn’t listening to citizens.

Facebook/Keith Goode

 

Next week ballots go in the mail for Aspen’s municipal election. Voters will choose from a large pool of candidates to fill two open seats on city council. Keith Goode is one of seven people running. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

"Reporter: Why are you running for city council?"

 

Goode: "I’ve been on the Planning and Zoning Board for the last four years and I really have enjoyed my time there. But, the main reason is when I hear people say ‘Aspen’s losing its character,’ I don’t buy that."

Kathy Williams

Today we wrap up our series profiling the candidates running in contested races for Glenwood Springs City Council. Kathy Williams is running for an at-large seat. Her big issue is the heavy traffic moving through downtown. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Kathy Williams has had a difficult life. In the 30 years she’s lived in Glenwood she’s dealt with cancer and divorce. She’s held a variety of jobs and currently works at a drugstore downtown. With her life experience, she says she brings a unique perspective to local politics.

Kathryn Trauger is running for an at-large seat on Glenwood Springs City Council. The long-time resident has made her opinions known on her blog. Now she wants a voice on city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A few years ago Trauger says she became discouraged with some things happening in city government.

"I was seeing a lot of misinformation and some things that were not communicated correctly, so I decided to start writing a blog."

Marci Krivonen

Our series examining the candidates running for office in Glenwood Springs, continues. Our focus is on the contested races. Today we introduce you to the second candidate vying for the Ward One seat on City Council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Russ Arensman wants to get back on city council. The former foreign journalist served a four year term that ended in 2011. He ran again and lost by four votes.

He thinks the city’s on the cusp of an economic rebound and believes local government can bolster growth.

Marci Krivonen

All this week Aspen Public Radio will be introducing you to the candidates running in contested races for Glenwood Springs City Council. Two spots are open on the seven-member board. Ballots will be counted April 7th. It’s a critical election for the city. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains why.

REPORTER: "Transportation issues are what make this election so critical for the City of Glenwood. What comes after the Grand Avenue Bridge replacement is one issue the candidates will have to deal with.”

Marci Krivonen

This election voters in Aspen will choose from a full list of candidates. A history of several candidates running for local office isn’t uncommon in Aspen. In fact, it’s the norm. This year, two people are running for a two-year mayor’s term. Seven are running for two open council seats. Council terms are four years. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Bill Stirling was mayor of Aspen for eight years from the mid 1980’s to the early 90’s. In one race, he decided to meet the public outdoors.

colorado.gov

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is declaring victory. He spoke to the media and supporters at the capitol this morning.

Votes have been tallied in 54 of Colorado’s 64 counties and the gubernatorial results are close with Hickenlooper leading by just one percentage point. His challenger congressman Bob Beauprez is refusing to concede. His campaign told the Denver Post about 120,000 votes still need to be counted.

Still, Hickenlooper said this morning he’s the victor. 

Elise Thatcher

Voters continued to stream into the Pitkin County Clerk’s Office in Aspen this afternoon. Filled-in ballots can be dropped off there and people can vote on-site until 7 o’clock tonight. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen caught up with some voters who talked about their top concerns.

Facebook/Patti Clapper

Update (10/31/14):

The Democrat running for Pitkin County Commission refused to comply with a probation order placed on her by the Colorado Board of Nursing.  That’s according to new information uncovered by the Aspen Times.

Part 2 of a talk from this past summer with an American Enterprise Institute scholar Karlyn Bowman on the election.

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