Environmental Health Perspectives

Elise Thatcher

This winter, Garfield County is partnering with doctors to get people to test their homes for radon. The naturally occurring gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer, and nearly half of Garfield County homes have levels higher than what’s considered safe. 

Ecoflight

A new study from the Colorado School of Public Health links natural gas development with certain birth defects. The report, Natural Gas Development and Birth Outcomes, found congenital heart defects were 30 percent more likely in infants born to mothers living close to natural gas development. These defects happen before birth, when the blood vessels near the heart don’t develop normally. Lisa McKenzie is a Research Associate at the University of Colorado’s School of Public Health.