environmental movement

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The number of ethnic minorities involved in environmental organizations across the country is dismally low and it’s the same in the Roaring Fork Valley. Some statewide groups have noticed the problem and are creating programs for the Latino community. They say reaching this population is an important step toward reducing carbon emissions. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dulce Saenz immigrated with her family to Colorado from Mexico when she was a toddler. She says she heard the term “carbon footprint” for the first time last year.

Of Fire Tents and Hut Trips

Jan 14, 2014
Will Roush

It could be an overly nuanced distinction to folks who don’t live in the mountains and spend much time in the woods, but I’ll make the case anyway: winter camping and hut trips are two very different experiences. One requires a tolerance for cold and a degree of suffering most people would prefer to pass up; the other involves cozy accommodations, light packs and comfy mattresses. Both usually include spectacular winter scenery and close friends.

nyupress.org

A book that looks at environmental crises, immigration and social inequality in the Roaring Fork Valley is being taught in college classrooms across the country. The Slums of Aspen was published by New York University Press in 2011. Now instructors of environmental sociology are using it at schools from Los Angeles to Boston. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.