The look of the forests in the Roaring Fork Valley may be dramatically different in the future. High elevation forests could be replaced with lower growing species like aspens. A new website shows how forests in the American West will look different under climate change. The local nonprofit Aspen Center for Environmental Studies worked with scientists to develop the site.

Jamie Werner is Forest Program Director at ACES. Her laptop’s propped open and she’s clicking around the site,

"So here we have Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands…”

W. Jacobi/Colorado State University

The Colorado State Forest Service says certain trees will be less colorful this fall. A wet spring and summer have been ideal conditions for at least two kind of fungus that are affecting aspen and cottonwood trees across much of Colorado.

Colorado’s Mountain Pine Beetle epidemic is subsiding but a new threat is on the rise. The Spruce beetle has killed large swaths of forests in Colorado’s southwest and a new report shows the Roaring Fork watershed is at risk. Drought and climate change are weakening trees, giving this native beetle a larger area to attack. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Jamie Cundiff. She’s the Forest Programs Director for the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies.