Garfield County

Miller & Newberg/Colorado Division of Insurance

   Colorado residents can keep their previous health care plans through the end of 2015, even if they don’t comply with the Affordable Care Act. State insurance officials announced the decision last week. They also explained how health care premiums could change for residents in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Garfield County recently released a report showing air pollution is on a decreasing trend. County officials attribute the decline in part, to improvements in how oil and gas companies operate in the region. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, some county residents don’t think the numbers tell the whole story.

Coroner Election

Apr 22, 2014

  The Garfield County Coroner position is up for election this year.  As it stands now the current coroner will not be running and only one candidate has signed up to run for the post so far.    That’s Republican Rob Glassmire who for the past 12 years has worled as an investigator for the Garfield County Sheriff’s Department.  APR's Roger Adams reports.

Creative Commons/Flickr/401(K) 2012

Pitkin County staff and elected leaders will meet with the State’s top insurance official this week about pricey health insurance. A Kaiser Health News report says Colorado’s “rating area eleven” that covers Pitkin, Eagle, Garfield and Summit Counties, is the most expensive insurance market in the country. Pitkin County Manager Jon Peacock says they’d like to see solutions.

Garfield County

   The Thompson Divide Coalition announced yesterday that Garfield County is supporting proposed legislation to protect the Thompson Divide. Hours later, the County denied that description… and said Commissioners said no such thing. 

 It was a day of dueling press releases. Around eleven A.M., the Coalition announced that commissioners with Pitkin, Gunnison and Garfield Counties are making a plea... to Republican Representative Scott Tipton to support pending legislation that would limit oil and gas development on the Thompson Divide.


Following complaints from customers and local officials about the high premiums for health care in resort mountain communities, state officials now say they will look into why health care prices are so high in Pitkin, Eagle and Garfield counties. The Colorado Division of Insurance announced Monday, February 3rd it’s launching a study to get to the bottom of that big question… despite the announcement, they don’t plan to lower premiums soon.

Helicopter Crash Kills Three Near Silt

Jan 28, 2014
Holy Cross Energy facebook page

Update - Tuesday January 28th, 2014 at 10:34pm:

Holy Cross Energy releases a photo and name of one of their employees who died in Monday's crash south of Silt as Larry Shaffer.

Post from the Holy Cross Energy facebook page:

Office of Governor John Hickenlooper

    Governor John Hickenlooper says he could get involved with bringing down health insurance prices. That could have a real impact for residents of the Roaring Fork Valley and other mountain towns. Garfield County asked the state's top official earlier this month to intervene with high premiums. The County believes Colorado officials did a sloppy job earlier this year when coming up with prices. But some experts say the state didn't make any mistakes.

Rick Reinhard

  Healthcare premiums under the Affordable Care Act are more expensive in the Roaring Fork Valley than in many parts of the state. They’re high in other mountain counties, too. Governor John Hickenlooper may get involved in bringing down those prices. Garfield County has asked him to intervene, arguing state officials did a bad job earlier this year when coming up with rates. Aspen Public Radio asked a national healthcare expert if the state failed to follow the rules. Reporter Elise Thatcher spoke with Alan Weil.

Ten percent of all pregnancies in Garfield County are to teenage mothers. That’s high compared to the national average. One non profit is working in schools to help bring down the teen pregnancy rate. They’re counting on a combination of education, access to contraception and community involvement. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.