Garfield County

www.garfield-county.com

Garfield County recently released a report showing air pollution is on a decreasing trend. County officials attribute the decline in part, to improvements in how oil and gas companies operate in the region. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, some county residents don’t think the numbers tell the whole story.

Coroner Election

Apr 22, 2014

  The Garfield County Coroner position is up for election this year.  As it stands now the current coroner will not be running and only one candidate has signed up to run for the post so far.    That’s Republican Rob Glassmire who for the past 12 years has worled as an investigator for the Garfield County Sheriff’s Department.  APR's Roger Adams reports.


Pitkin County Tackles Pricey Health Insurance Problem

Apr 15, 2014
Creative Commons/Flickr/401(K) 2012

Pitkin County staff and elected leaders will meet with the State’s top insurance official this week about pricey health insurance. A Kaiser Health News report says Colorado’s “rating area eleven” that covers Pitkin, Eagle, Garfield and Summit Counties, is the most expensive insurance market in the country. Pitkin County Manager Jon Peacock says they’d like to see solutions.

Garfield County

   The Thompson Divide Coalition announced yesterday that Garfield County is supporting proposed legislation to protect the Thompson Divide. Hours later, the County denied that description… and said Commissioners said no such thing. 

 It was a day of dueling press releases. Around eleven A.M., the Coalition announced that commissioners with Pitkin, Gunnison and Garfield Counties are making a plea... to Republican Representative Scott Tipton to support pending legislation that would limit oil and gas development on the Thompson Divide. 

http://justforthehealthofit9hf.blogspot.com/

    

Following complaints from customers and local officials about the high premiums for health care in resort mountain communities, state officials now say they will look into why health care prices are so high in Pitkin, Eagle and Garfield counties. The Colorado Division of Insurance announced Monday, February 3rd it’s launching a study to get to the bottom of that big question… despite the announcement, they don’t plan to lower premiums soon.

Helicopter Crash Kills Three Near Silt

Jan 28, 2014
Holy Cross Energy facebook page

Update - Tuesday January 28th, 2014 at 10:34pm:

Holy Cross Energy releases a photo and name of one of their employees who died in Monday's crash south of Silt as Larry Shaffer.

Post from the Holy Cross Energy facebook page:

Office of Governor John Hickenlooper

    Governor John Hickenlooper says he could get involved with bringing down health insurance prices. That could have a real impact for residents of the Roaring Fork Valley and other mountain towns. Garfield County asked the state's top official earlier this month to intervene with high premiums. The County believes Colorado officials did a sloppy job earlier this year when coming up with prices. But some experts say the state didn't make any mistakes.

Rick Reinhard

  Healthcare premiums under the Affordable Care Act are more expensive in the Roaring Fork Valley than in many parts of the state. They’re high in other mountain counties, too. Governor John Hickenlooper may get involved in bringing down those prices. Garfield County has asked him to intervene, arguing state officials did a bad job earlier this year when coming up with rates. Aspen Public Radio asked a national healthcare expert if the state failed to follow the rules. Reporter Elise Thatcher spoke with Alan Weil.

Garfield County Grapples with High Teen Birth Rate

Dec 27, 2013
www.garfieldcountyprep.org

Ten percent of all pregnancies in Garfield County are to teenage mothers. That’s high compared to the national average. One non profit is working in schools to help bring down the teen pregnancy rate. They’re counting on a combination of education, access to contraception and community involvement. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Elise Thatcher

Garfield County wants Governor John Hickenlooper to intervene with the state's new health insurance rules. The county has some of the highest premiums in Colorado under new guidelines, which are part of the Affordable Care Act. The state agency in charge of the new rules recently visited communities around the state to explain why premiums are so high. But Garfield County officials remain unconvinced.

Colorado State Patrol

Seat belts could have prevented major injuries in October’s major bus crash near Carbondale. A Roaring Fork Transit Authority bus rolled onto its side, sending at least ten people to the hospital. Less a month later, the federal government decided to require seat belts in exactly the kind of bus that wrecked. The requirement won’t start until 2016. In the meantime, an internal investigation and county traffic court are delving into what happened the night of the accident.

Elise Thatcher

Colorado has a problem with air pollution… levels of ozone have been going up, and that can cause health problems. So the state is taking a look at tightening up air regulations for drilling companies. But, some say much is being done already. 

Law Enforcement: Meth is a Significant Problem in Rifle

Sep 12, 2013
tridentnarc.com

Methamphetamine has made headlines in Garfield County recently. On Monday, law enforcement officials announced they collected 117 grams of meth in the Rifle area. The drug enforcement team TRIDENT made eight arrests in the drug bust. Also, authorities announced this week a meth overdose was to blame for a mysterious death. Rifle resident Anthony Green fell over dead around midnight on August 22 on a downtown street.

Flickr/Dave H

The federal government yesterday (Thurs., 8-29-13) said it won’t sue to stop recreational marijuana use in Colorado and Washington. The news comes a little over a week after Garfield County commissioners voted to ban recreational marijuana businesses in certain areas of the county. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth spoke to one of the commissioners who voted in favor of the ban and filed this report.  

Garfield County Commissioner John Martin says the federal government’s latest stance on recreational marijuana has left him feeling somewhat confused.

Office of Senator Mark Udall

Summit County is angling for an Act of Congress. Not just any act-- one that allows the County to buy a chunk of Forest Service land. The idea is to use it for affordable housing... an unusual plan in Colorado.

The next time you drive through Summit County on Interstate 70, look southeast, towards Dillon Dam Road and Dillon Reservoir. Forty acres there could become home for local residents. County Commissioner Dan Gibbs, a big supporter of the plan, says the land has “lost its forest character.”

Garfield County

Two of the largest employers in Glenwood Springs finalized a land swap yesterday, that’s been in the works for decades. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more on the exchange between Garfield County and Valley View Hospital.

Facebook/Refuel Colorado Fleets

Garfield County is one of nine Colorado counties chosen to participate in a program meant to expand alternative fuels. Refuel Colorado Fleets aims to power more vehicles with fuels like compressed natural gas. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Under the plan, a group of so-called “energy coaches” will connect businesses and government agencies with auto dealers, fuel providers and others in the transportation sector. It's in an effort to create an infrastructure for unconventional fuels.

Marci Krivonen

On July 1st,  two controversial gun laws go into effect in Colorado and one local sheriff is speaking out against them. Garfield County Sheriff Lou Vallario says the gun magazine law and the background check bill are too confusing to enforce. One law limits gun magazines to 15 rounds and the other requires background checks for all transfers and sales of firearms.

Vallario and five dozen other Colorado sheriffs are suing the state over the new laws. They don’t believe the laws are enforceable or constitutional. Sheriff Vallario spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

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