Glenwood Springs

Grayson Schaffer

Glenwood Springs is a contender for being one of Outside magazine’s best towns. Such listings can be music to the ears of town promoters, but can also increase the demand for local resources, like housing. As Aspen Public Radio is reporting this month, the lack of rental housing in the Roaring Fork Valley is having a significant effect on locals. Jonah Ogles is Senior Editor with Outside Magazine, and talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. He says Outside often gets criticism for listing communities as desirable.

Joleen Cohen

Finding decent housing in Aspen and parts of the Roaring Fork Valley has always been difficult. But the increasing shortage in rentals, especially in the Mid-Valley, is having a significant impact on residents. In the first in our series about housing in the Valley, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher has this story.

Mountain Edition - April 23rd, 2015

Apr 23, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

RFTA gets millions for more parking, service, and facilities.

A Basalt woman is sentenced for causing a fatal accident last August.

Aspen Skiing Company and pro skier Alice McKennis look back on the season.

There’s a new book about Glenwood Springs history.

A nonprofit aims to restore part of the Crystal River in Carbondale.

And we find out about the country’s biggest conservation effort ever and a bird here in Colorado.

That’s ahead on Mountain Edition.

Elise Thatcher

There’s a new book about the history of Glenwood Springs. Called "Images of Early Glenwood Springs," it’s a compilation of photos from the late 1800s through 1920. Cynthia Hines is the author, and she’s also Executive Director of the Frontier Historical Society in Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Hines about the book.

 

Creative Commons/Flickr/Vox Efx

Glenwood Springs residents have chosen new city council members and decided on a ballot question. Steve Davis won the council seat for Ward 1, which covers the western section of Glenwood Springs. Kathryn Trauger won the At Large seat.

http://www.thearmchairexplorer.com/colorado/glenwood_springs_colorado

The White River National Forest headquarters in Glenwood Springs has re-opened for business. The National Forest Service says the supervisor and staff returned this morning to their newly renovated offices at 900 Grand Avenue. Among the upgrades are improved heating and cooling systems, energy saving electrical, water saving plumbing as well as the removal of asbestos from the historic building. For the past two years, the 30-plus employees of the White River National Forest have worked remotely from ranger stations in Rifle, Carbondale, Minturn and the BLM office in Silt.

Glenwood City Council race: Kathy Williams

Mar 27, 2015
Kathy Williams

Today we wrap up our series profiling the candidates running in contested races for Glenwood Springs City Council. Kathy Williams is running for an at-large seat. Her big issue is the heavy traffic moving through downtown. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Kathy Williams has had a difficult life. In the 30 years she’s lived in Glenwood she’s dealt with cancer and divorce. She’s held a variety of jobs and currently works at a drugstore downtown. With her life experience, she says she brings a unique perspective to local politics.

Glenwood City Council race: Kathryn Trauger

Mar 26, 2015

Kathryn Trauger is running for an at-large seat on Glenwood Springs City Council. The long-time resident has made her opinions known on her blog. Now she wants a voice on city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A few years ago Trauger says she became discouraged with some things happening in city government.

"I was seeing a lot of misinformation and some things that were not communicated correctly, so I decided to start writing a blog."

Glenwood City Council Race: Tony Hershey

Mar 25, 2015
Tony Hershey

Three people are vying to fill one at-large seat on the Glenwood Springs City Council. The contenders vary on their reasons for running, but all say it’s a crucial election. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen caught up with candidate Tony Hershey.

Reporter: "Why did you decide to run for Glenwood Springs City Council?"

Hershey: "I think there’s a lot of change coming and it’s an important time. I think the city definitely needs to move in a different direction."

Glenwood City Council Race: Russ Arensman

Mar 24, 2015
Marci Krivonen

Our series examining the candidates running for office in Glenwood Springs, continues. Our focus is on the contested races. Today we introduce you to the second candidate vying for the Ward One seat on City Council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Russ Arensman wants to get back on city council. The former foreign journalist served a four year term that ended in 2011. He ran again and lost by four votes.

He thinks the city’s on the cusp of an economic rebound and believes local government can bolster growth.

Meghan Hurley is the Mental Health Therapist at River Bridge Regional Center. She discuses her work with survivors of child abuse and how talk therapy can be the best method for healing. And Kerry Ach, the Community Outreach Coordinator, give details about Imagine 3, the organization's annual fundraiser on April 4th. 

Learn more about River Bridge at www.RiverBridgeRC.org, and Imagine 3 HERE

Glenwood City Council race: Steve Davis

Mar 23, 2015
Marci Krivonen

All this week Aspen Public Radio will be introducing you to the candidates running in contested races for Glenwood Springs City Council. Two spots are open on the seven-member board. Ballots will be counted April 7th. It’s a critical election for the city. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains why.

REPORTER: "Transportation issues are what make this election so critical for the City of Glenwood. What comes after the Grand Avenue Bridge replacement is one issue the candidates will have to deal with.”

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The Aspen City Council this week chose a brewery/business incubator/TV station to be the new tenant at the old art museum.

The long dormant Buffalo Valley property outside of Glenwood Springs looks like it will become an apartment complex.

A new aerial fire center is coming to the Rifle airport. And the citizens of that town may just get a dose of fluoride in their water.

Scott Turner is the Assistant District Attorney of the Ninth Judicial District in Glenwood Springs. He works with River Bridge Regional Center on child abuse cases. In this episode, Turner talks about the challenges and rewards of his job, and Mental Health Therapist, Meghan Hurley, shares statistics on local cases and offenders.  

Learn more about River Bridge at www.RiverBridgeRC.org

writermarkstevens.com

 

Colorado writer Mark Stevens has written three murder mystery novels that are set in the Flattops Wilderness near Glenwood Springs. His latest book, Trapline, was released in November. He was signing books at Explore Booksellers in Aspen on Saturday. Stevens, who lives in Denver, explained to Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen why he chose the Flattops as the backdrop for his books.

Mark Stevens is the author of Trapline, a murder mystery novel set in the Flattops Wilderness near Glenwood Springs. Stevens’ fourth book comes out in September.

Your Morning News - January 28th, 2015

Jan 28, 2015

Glenwood Hot Springs Responds to Bacteria Complaint

The Glenwood Hot Springs says it is keeping up with making sure one of its pools is safe to use. The business told Aspen Public Radio last night that routine maintenance already does a good job preventing too much of a certain kind of bacteria.

Last summer, the therapy pool at the Hot Springs tested positive for a bacteria that can cause what’s called hot tub rash. It is dangerous only for people with weaker immune systems like cancer patients. John Bosco is Chief Operations Officer with the business.

“The levels shown in the test results are, it’s arguable, whether it’s a level that’s deemed very dangerous or whether it’s not. The state does not currently have any requirements for testing and monitoring.”

Garfield County officials agree that the Glenwood Hot Springs Pool and Lodge has measures in place to keep the water clean. Josh Williams is Environmental Health Manager.

“I mean their monitoring and tracking of that is above and beyond the required testing is for bacterial contamination. Which is a good indicator that they take it very seriously.”

Garfield County says the bacteria are naturally occurring, though also the leading cause of hospital infections. The possibility of high levels at the Glenwood Hot Springs recently came to light after a local resident publicly complained this week saying government officials aren’t doing enough to prevent the bacteria from being dangerous. She had originally complained last year of ongoing severe intestinal sickness.

Your Evening News - January 27th, 2015

Jan 27, 2015

Customer Airs Concerns About Glenwood Hot Springs

Garfield County officials are not asking the Glenwood Hot Springs Pool and Lodge to change sanitary measures after a bacteria complaint.

Last summer, the therapy pool at the hot springs tested positive for a bacteria that isn’t regulated by the state or federal government. It’s one of the causes of hot tub rash, but is dangerous only for people with weaker immune systems, like cancer patients. Josh Williams is Garfield County environmental health manager and explains his review of the hot springs’ regular efforts to keep facilities clean.

“I mean their monitoring and tracking of that is above and beyond the required testing is for bacterial contamination. Which is a good indicator that they take it very seriously,” says Josh Williams.

The possible issue of bacteria recently came to light after a local resident this past fall complained of ongoing severe intestinal sickness. She publicly complained this week, saying government officials aren’t doing enough to prevent it from happening again. Garfield County says the bacteria is naturally occurring, though also the leading cause of hospital infections. Aspen Public Radio is waiting for comment from the Glenwood Hot Springs.

Your Evening News - December 30th, 2014

Dec 30, 2014

Ski Co to Open Idaho Resort

The Aspen Skiing Company is expanding its operations to Idaho. The ski operator closed on a property in Ketchum and plans to build a new hotel, modeled after an existing one in Aspen.

The Ski Co will develop a new Limelight Hotel close to Sun Valley’s River Run base of the ski area Bald Mountain. The Limelight in Aspen features large guest rooms, an expansive lounge, a lobby restaurant, and adventure programming for guests.

In a statement, the Ski Co’s Vice President for Hospitality Don Schuster says the company feels the timing is right to grow the “Limelight brand” and that downtown Ketchum is an ideal location.

The hotel in Idaho will include more than 100 hotel rooms and eleven free market residential units. The Skiing Company purchased the Limelight hotel in Aspen in 2010 from the Paas/Woolery families.

Your Evening News - December 24th, 2014

Dec 24, 2014

Crystal Palace Revue says “Farewell” Tomorrow

A decades old tradition in Aspen is coming to an end. Tomorrow will see the last performances of the Crystal Palace Revue. The vast majority of those performing worked at the Crystal Palace dinner theater in downtown Aspen from the 1960s through the late 2000s. After the iconic business sold, performances have continued during the holiday season. Nina Gabianelli oversees the Crystal Palace Players and explains busy schedules and other commitments make it time to move on.

“We don’t want to just slap something together, and have people not have a positive memory of the crystal palace. We want to make sure that what you remember is what we did best.”

Like in years past, tomorrow evening’s programs will feature satire including politics and the environment and will be held at the Wheeler Opera House.

Valley Roundup - December 19th, 2014

Dec 19, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup – a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week, development can often seem like three-dimensional chess – we’ll get the latest on Mark Hunt’s lodging plans for Aspen.

A wider runway is on the horizon for the Aspen Pitkin County Airport. But, if citizens need to vote on it would it get approved?

Rifle remembers the life of Air Force Captain William DuBois as he is laid to rest.

Glenwood Springs will get a review of air quality near downtown.

Could an antique chair lift derail Aspen Mountain’s world cup racing plans?

How many weed shops are too many… one… six… sixteen?

And, I’ll have a conversation with a familiar name in the valley, and voice you hear often on this program, who is taking a leadership role in the Aspen Public Radio news room.

Joining me this week are Curtis Wackerle, Managing Editor of the Aspen Daily News and Randy Essex, Editor of the Glenwood Post Independent.

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