health insurance

Tracy Olson/Flickr

  Pitkin County has been spending millions of dollars on medical care for its workers. That’s dropped dramatically in recent years. Pitkin County is projected to spend more than $3.6 million in the 2015 calendar year, a significant drop from previous years.

Elise Thatcher

Hundreds of area residents attended a health insurance forum in Basalt on Thursday night. The last-minute event was co-coordinated by State Senator Kerry Donovan and the state’s health exchange, after thousands of locals found out this fall that their coverage will end in January.


Basalt Chamber of Commerce

There will be two large events in Basalt and El Jebel this week aimed at tackling big questions about health insurance. Basalt resident Robin Waters originally had hoped to arrange one event. She’s received so many questions and support, she and a variety of officials are now coordinating a forum and what she’s calling an enrollment fair.


  A state senator is hoping to help people in the Roaring Fork Valley who have to get a new insurance plan for next year. About seven thousand residents in the Pitkin, Eagle, Garfield and Summit counties will have to shop for new health coverage, after the state dropped the ax on the health insurance carrier Colorado HealthOp.

Marci Krivonen


Aspen Valley Hospital is asking voters this fall to continue a property tax that has helped pay operating costs for the past twenty years. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, there’s no formal opposition to Question 5A, but voters are wondering when enough is enough when it comes to medical costs.

  The Valley Health Alliance will be hearing from a national expert on worker health and safety on Thursday, October 15th. Researcher Doctor Casey Chosewood is with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which is part of the Centers for Disease Control.

Elise Thatcher

Pitkin, Eagle, and Garfield counties are lagging behind when it comes to helping more people get health insurance. A recent review shows residents in the Roaring Fork Valley are more likely to not have coverage, compared to the statewide average. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher sat down with Michele Lueck, President and CEO of the Colorado Health Institute in Denver. Lueck’s organization analyzed the data.

tedeytan/Flickr/Creative Commons

  Health insurance rates for the Roaring Fork Valley area will increase again next year. But for most companies, monthly fees are not going up by as much as they have in the past. That’s according to the Denver nonprofit, Colorado Consumer Health Initiative.


  It’s getting into tax season, and this is the first time residents will have to pay a fine if they didn’t have health insurance in 2014. That’ll be true for 2015 taxes as well, if someone can’t prove they have health insurance this year. For those signing up for health coverage through the statewide online exchange, counties in the Roaring Fork Valley worked together to get as many people signed on as possible. 

Your Morning News - February 12th, 2015

Feb 12, 2015

Lawyer for Aspen Teen Delves into Details

The Aspen high school student who was forced to the ground and arrested by police [last] Friday, is working with a lawyer. Trial Attorney Ryan Kalamaya will represent the teen who police suspect had marijuana.

Kalamaya says he was contacted by the teen’s family after the incident happened at a bus stop near the Aspen school campus. Video footage taken by a student on the scene and then widely shared on the internet shows two officers and a civilian taking down the screaming boy. One officer uses a pressure-point compliance tactic. Police say the boy resisted arrest. Kalamaya says the incident raises issues around marijuana and the use of police power.

“The reason I wanted to take it on was because this issue of the role of law enforcement in our society is obviously a hot topic. It’s a healthy dialogue to talk about the role of police here in the Roaring Fork Valley.”  

The teenager will appear in court on February 17th, where he will face possible charges.

Ryan Kalamaya is a member of Aspen Public Radio’s Citizens Advisory Board.