high school

Energetics Education is a young non-profit organization based in Carbondale that works to bring energy education programs into high schools. Established in 2014, the organization has one program - Solar Rollers - that gives solar car kits to high schoolers and hosts a competitive race for the school teams in the spring.   

Noah Davis is the executive director of Energetics Education and shares his personal history in energy and education, and what inspired him to start the organization.

Facebook/Aspen Hope Center

The Aspen Hope Center turns five on June 1st. The nonprofit serves those in emotional crisis with most clients either dealing with mental health problems or substance abuse. Last year, the organization made headlines as it worked to tackle the problem of suicide after a cluster of deaths happened in a matter of days. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The organization started in 2010 after a study showed the Roaring Fork Valley needed more mental health services. Aspen resident Joe Disalvo already knew that.

The Colorado Rocky Mountain School's 60-year history is chock-full of interesting characters - people who believe work in the classroom should be coupled with physical work and outdoor education. The end result: a curious, knowledgeable, and well-rounded 18-year old. Mark Clark started his journey with CRMS in 1979. He is a CRMS faculty member and splits his time between Carbondale and Wyoming. 

Learn more about the Colorado Rocky Mountain School at www.crms.org.   

Marci Krivonen

The music department at the Aspen School District is growing, despite the odds. The budget for music is minimal compared to schools in other states. Last week though, the school welcomed its first ever musician in residence who taught middle and high school students jazz. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen visited band practice and filed this report.

Band practice is in full swing on a Wednesday afternoon. Students with saxophones, trumpets and drums tap their feet as the piece they’re playing reaches a crescendo.


Ten percent of all pregnancies in Garfield County are to teenage mothers. That’s high compared to the national average. One non profit is working in schools to help bring down the teen pregnancy rate. They’re counting on a combination of education, access to contraception and community involvement. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.