Colorado Parks and Wildlife wants input on how it should operate in the coming years. The agency generates its own $200 million dollar budget. The lion’s share comes from hunting licenses and similar fees. And that revenue is dropping because the agency is selling fewer licenses. CPW is looking for public input on how to make up for the losses, which could include new user fees. 

Your Morning News - February 10th, 2015

Feb 10, 2015

Basalt May Take Out Loans for New Underpass

The Town of Basalt may take out short-term loans in order to pay for a new underpass at a busy Highway 82 intersection. A pedestrian underpass is planned at Basalt Avenue, near RFTA’s Bus Rapid Transit stop.

The project is projected to cost $4.8 million with contributions from CDOT, RFTA and possibly other local governments. Basalt plans to go before the Elected Officials Transportation Committee next month. Town Manager Mike Scanlon says the project has been on Basalt’s radar for years.

“It was the number two project in 2004 and I think it’s always been that high. It’s just that nobody’s put the effort and financing together.”

He says the underpass will improve safety and provide a better connection between Old Town and southside Basalt. Construction could start this fall. Basalt Town Council will consider using loans or “certificates of participation” at its meeting tonight.

Your Evening News - February 9th, 2015

Feb 9, 2015

Aspen Police Chief Responds on Teen Arrest Video

A video of a student being arrested Friday has gone viral throughout the Roaring Fork Valley. Police say the juvenile had marijuana, and resisted arrest. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason spoke with Aspen Police chief Richard Pryor about what happened.

A 16-year-old was taken down by two police officers and a civilian in a bus shelter near Aspen High School on Friday. That was after Officer Adam Loudon says he observed that the student had marijuana. He allegedly resisted arrest. The incident has some in the community saying it was excessive force. Chief Pryor defends his officers’ actions, saying officer Loudon attempted to talk to the boy but his behavior led to an elevated response.

“I can understand the angst in the video creates amongst some in the community. In terms of the contact, there’s no cooperation, there’s no willingness to engage in dialogue, there’s nowhere to go. That’s where things start to get really difficult for both sides.”

Pryor says his office is looking into revealing more information about what happened before the altercation.

Colorado’s mule deer population has been shrinking for years and wildlife officials are trying to bring it back up. In 2006, the population numbered 600,000. That dropped by almost half last year. Hunters say they notice the shortage, specifically in northwest Colorado. On Saturday, Colorado Parks and Wildlife will present ideas on how to increase the population at a special summit in Glenwood Springs. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Jody Kennedy of Parks and Wildlife.

Women Target for Hunting & Fishing Skills

Jul 17, 2014
Lynn Waldorf

The number of women who are hunting and fishing is growing and in some years is outpacing the number of men who receive hunting licenses.  This trend hasn’t been missed by Colorado’s Division of Parks and Wildlife which relies heavily on license sales to fund its management of wild lands.  Earlier this week, Parks and Wildlife hosted a free hunting and fishing clinic for women in Basalt.  Dorothy Atkins went along and filed this report.

Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife

Most hunting seasons are winding down, but things are just getting busy at the Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife. The agency is starting up its annual survey of animals across the state, which can require something called “net-gunning.” Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with Division Spokesman Mike Porras.



Hunters in Colorado are threatening to boycott the state this year over new gun laws... and if they make good on their promise the protest could end up hurting wildlife across the state. The fees hunters pay make up more than half of the state’s wildlife budget. 

Below is a transcript of reporter Elise Thatcher's story: