immigration attorney

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me this week are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News. I’m Carolyn Sackariason and you are listening to Valley Roundup, an analysis and commentary of the week’s news with writers and editors. We continue our conversation with Jason Auslander, reporter for the Aspen Times, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent and Lorenzo Semple, columnist for the Aspen Daily News.

 

 

Aspen Public Radio News

This past week, immigration authorities arrested hundreds of undocumented people across the country. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said this is nothing out of the ordinary.

In a recent executive order, President Donald Trump took aim at “sanctuary cities.” These are places that, supposedly, don’t comply with federal immigration authorities.

Jennifer Smith is an immigration attorney in Glenwood Springs. For more than a decade, she’s helped immigrants from all around the world navigate the complexities of immigration law.

Your Morning News - November 25th, 2014

Nov 25, 2014

New Snowmastodon Research Released

A new volume of research documents in detail the Ice Age fossil find in Snowmass Village. The Denver Museum of Nature and Science announced yesterday the so-called Snowmastodon Project Science Volume is being published in an international journal.

Fourteen papers by 47 authors from the United States and abroad contributed to the work. Snowmastodon Project co-leader Dr. Ian Miller says it represents a new benchmark for understanding climate change in the American West.

Marci Krivonen

The growing number of Central American child immigrants gathering at the U.S. border is a crisis that has drawn attorneys from around the country.  One of them is Glenwood Springs immigration attorney Jennifer Smith. She traveled to Artesia, New Mexico last month, where hundreds of women and children are being detained at a law enforcement training center. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

When attorney Jennifer Smith got word that help was needed in Artesia, she jumped in her car and drove ten hours straight to the small town in southwestern New Mexico.