Local Elections

If you’re a Glenwood Springs resident, you still have time to vote. Though, city officials say mailing the ballot is no longer an option. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Ballots in the all-mail ballot election will be counted Tuesday. To make your ballot count, you must drop it off instead of sticking it in the mail. Ann Green is deputy city clerk.

“They must drop off their ballot either at the county courthouse east door, or here at City Hall. There’s a box in front of municipal court.”

Town Hall Meeting on the “Keep Aspen Aspen” ballot referendum recorded on Wednesday March 25th, 2015 at the Belly Up Aspen.

The forum is moderated by Aspen Public Radio News Director Carolyn Sackariason and features supporters and opponents of the May 5th ballot measure that would force a public vote for development variances over a particular threshold.

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The Red Brick Center for the Arts will be Aspen’s second vote center for this spring’s election.

All registered voters will receive mail in ballots, which can be mailed back or dropped off at City Hall. On election day, residents can also cast their ballot at the clerk’s office in City Hall or the Red Brick Center for the Arts. 

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If Aspen voters pass a charter referendum this spring, that will mean rewriting the city’s land use code. On Monday, City Council decided to tighten up when developers can build extra large buildings. Council Members restricted exceptions, called waivers, to five percent bigger than the square footage normally allowed, and two feet higher than maximum height. They also removed affordable housing waivers, except for projects benefitting the community or part of the historic preservation program. Council did not change parking requirements.

Join Aspen Public Radio for a live broadcast of a Town Hall Meeting on the “Keep Aspen Aspen” ballot referendum, Wednesday March 25th from 5:30-7:00pm from the Belly Up Aspen.

This moderated forum is open to the public and will feature proponents and opponents of the measure along with Michael Kinsley – an architect of the slow growth zoning in Pitkin County.

The town hall is free to attend or listen live worldwide through Aspen Public Radio, on-air or on-line, for this special event.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

The City of Aspen just got the results of an audit of a multi-year parking scam. Elected officials wonder if they should look at other departments as closely.

After three months of analyzing and negotiating, the Roaring Fork School District finally inked contracts with its superintendent and assistant superintendent.

AspenSpin.com

A retired Wall Street money manager turned local writer is running for a seat on the Aspen City Council. Andrew Israel says is behind the website AspenSpin.com.  Israel says, if elected, his first plan of action will be to keep city council meetings from going into the early hours of the morning.

Roger Adams

A well-known retired politician around Aspen is taking another run at city council. Former Mayor Mick Ireland says he’s seeking a council seat in this spring’s election. The former mayor says his emphasis will be on moderate, sustainable growth that respects the community’s character with a keen eye on land use and zoning issues.

“We need some more through thinking about our future and we need an alignment of our values with our land use code… and I think we have gotten a little off track.”

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

Aspen lost another longtime local in avalanche. And this week marks the first anniversary of the murder of Aspen native Nancy Pfister.

Municipal elections are coming up in Glenwood Springs and Aspen. This year, it’s all mail-in. But in Aspen, you can still vote in a traditional way at two polling places.

Meanwhile, Aspen City Council is countering a citizen ballot measure on development limitations. Will it just confuse voters more?

This spring’s municipal election in Aspen could cost twice as much as previous ones. That’s in an effort to increase voter turnout. The majority of Aspen City Council earlier this year decided to hold an all mail-in ballot election. The theory is that more people will vote from the comfort of their homes, rather than going to a polling place.

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