marijuana

Creative Commons/Flickr/Mark

Three laboratories in the Denver area are handling the bulk of testing for safety and potency of recreational marijuana in Colorado. State law requires manufacturers of edibles like marijuana-infused brownies, to have their products tested for potency. And, growers of marijuana plants are subject to testing too. Denver-based journalist Nelson Harvey visited the labs and wrote a story for the Aspen Business Journal. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with him and asked how scientists are doing such tests.

Marci Krivonen

Governor John Hickenlooper says when it comes to legal marijuana, the future is still somewhat hazy in Colorado. Recreational pot became legal last year and retailers started selling it in January. Hickenlooper looked back yesterday on how the process has gone so far, in a talk at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The Dope on Pot: Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper and Katie Couric in Conversation

Recreational pot became legal in Colorado last year and retailers started selling it in January. While regulations were set up before retail sales started, the State of Colorado has enacted new laws to fine tune aspects of concern to lawmakers. Two new measures signed into law this spring included labeling for marijuana edibles as well as dosage regulations. Over the past seven months, the new marijuana industry is a tax revenue boon. It’s expected to bring in between $60-$80 million in taxes for Colorado in 2014.

John Hickenlooper, Katie Couric

CO Sheriffs Debate Pot Legalization

Jun 19, 2014

It's been six months since selling marijuana officially became legal in Colorado. And now county sheriffs across Colorado are dealing with how to enforce the new law. That issue played out during a bi-annual sheriffs’ conference held in Aspen last week. Dorothy Atkins has the story.

Marci Krivonen

Summer in Aspen not only means warm weather and crowds, it also means businesses are hiring. The resort has a seasonal economy and, some companies are reviewing their drug and alcohol policies now that marijuana is legal in Colorado. It's causing some confusion for employers and raising questions for human resources departments. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Since marijuana became legal for adults in Colorado, Alicia Miller has been getting a lot of questions from employees at Aspen Valley Hospital.

High water on the Crystal River has forced the Gunnison County Sheriff’s office to call off a search for a missing kayaker.

Rivers in the Valley are dangerously high. One stretch of the Colorado River is too full to float, so a commercial rafting company changed its route.

A local photographer is back from the Colorado River Delta, where he witnessed the Colorado River reconnect to the sea.

Jimmy Carter and Amory Lovins are a few guests set to speak at this summer’s American Renewable Energy Day in Aspen - we’ll have a preview.

And, more than a dozen new art sculptures were installed on Carbondale’s busy streets this week.

Finally, we’ll take you to Hunter S. Thompson’s old homestead for a cookout hosted by a marijuana advocacy group.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Marci Krivonen

Some of the heavy hitters in the marijuana community celebrated its legalization in Colorado at an event near Woody Creek. The group NORML, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, held a cookout over the weekend at Owl Farm, Hunter S. Thompson’s old homestead. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen was there and filed this report.

Residents in the Roaring Fork Valley have been the target of recent scams. We’ll have the latest.

Will tourists flock to mountain communities this summer? One resort analyst thinks so.

And, fire season is already underway in the Western U.S. Fire officials tell Roaring Fork Valley residents now is the time to get ready.

A former director of the Colorado State Lottery is entering the race for Congress...but, he’ll need more than just a scratch ticket to win the job in Washington.

Aspen Valley Hospital is in the middle of its switch from paper files to electronic patient records.

Finally, Governor Hickenlooper made law a pair of measures this week that tighten rules around marijuana.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

Today, we’ll bring you the latest with the investigation into the murder of Aspen native Nancy Pfister.

Republicans and Democrats are whittling down the contenders for state and local elections this fall.

Aspen’s first recreational pot shop starts selling buds… and we find out how much Carbondale has made on marijuana taxes.

And we hear from a Paralympic coach who arrived in Sochi this week. With the international tensions in nearby Ukraine, we’ll hear how safe athletes are feeling.

Mountain Edition - February 13th, 2014

Feb 13, 2014

A new report says there isn’t enough natural gas in the Thompson Divide to make it worth drilling. But the industry argues there aren’t enough facts to say if the leases would be a bust…

A new marijuana task force is meeting for the first time today. The goal is to monitor the effects of recreational pot on the Roaring Fork Valley.

The City of Aspen’s utility wants to run on 100-percent renewable energy and its enlisted the help of a government laboratory to help them get there. Aspen will inch closer to its renewable goal when it starts taking power from a new hydro plant in Ridgway later this month.

Local teenagers are getting a lesson on slam poetry. Two performance artists are visiting schools this week, teaching kids how to write and deliver “spoken word” poetry.

Finally, a Durango biathlete is competing in Sochi tomorrow. Her story is a unique one - she owes her Olympic bid to her twin sister.

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