KAJX

Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness

Wilderness Workshop

After the city took a rare step in seeking public input, staff is rejecting the overwhelming suggestion to abandon the rights. David Hornbacher, who is heading up the project for the city, wrote in a memo to city council that staff recommends keeping those rights.

Brent Gardner-Smith/Aspen Journaiism

City of Aspen staff is directing council to keep water rights for reservoirs on Castle and Maroon Creeks. As Elizabeth Stewart-Severy reports, this goes against public sentiment.

In 1967 three local Aspen women, Joy Caudill, Dottie Fox, and Connie Harvey, came together with two goals: 1. to designate the Hunter-Fryingpan  Wilderness and Collegiate Peaks areas as wilderness, and 2. to double the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness area. 

Courtesy of Wilderness Workshop

The City of Aspen is holding a public open house today to discuss its conditional water rights on Castle and Maroon Creeks.

Aspen Public Radio News

It’s no secret that Conundrum Hot Springs is a popular spot for hikers and campers, so much so that the U.S. Forest Service said it’s losing the wilderness for a different kind of wild. This summer, officials are working on a permit system to try to preserve the fragile area.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Eight Air Force Academy cadets, their professor, and about ten U.S. Forest Service workers sweated side by side last week, pouring concrete, hauling 500 pound beams, and battling swarms of black flies about a mile past Maroon Lake in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness.

Courtesy of White River National Forest

Campers in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness will need to store all food and garbage in bear-resistant containers for the next five years.

A summer of consistent  bear encounters has led to a Forest Service order closing camping at crater lake in Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness.

The Wilderness Land Act was created 51 years ago in order to "establish a National Wilderness Preservation System for the permanent good for the whole people, and for other purposes"  (1964).  

Twenty-five years ago, Jon Mulford, a lawyer from Aspen, was driven to start The Wilderness Land Trust after the purchase of a large private inholding, which the buyer intended to develop. The organization buys inholdings and sells the purchased land to the U.S. Government to be protected as wilderness. Since its founding in 1992, the organization has expanded from the Roaring Fork Valley to seven states in the Western U.S. 

Mulford discusses the history and progression of the organization. 

On today's show, the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act and the Maroon Bells birthday bash with Olivia Siegel from ACES, Will Roush of Wilderness Workshop and Andrew Larson of the White River National Forest.

Also, Kelly Alford, Executive Director of Wyly Arts, and artist Jody Guralnick on the new Wyly Annex and Jody's show opening August 8th.

Mountain Edition - July 31st, 2014

Jul 31, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

The Wilderness Act turns 50 this year and we’re devoting this entire show to the topic.

First, we’ll look back on how the Maroon Bells/Snowmass Wilderness became protected. A group of local women had a hand in it.

The wilderness in our backyard is one of the busiest in the state. The Forest Service says some areas are being loved to death.

Another problem facing wilderness is private land smack-dab in the middle of these peaceful places. One local group is working to make wilderness more wild.

And, a group of local organizations is throwing a birthday bash for the Maroon Bells this weekend. We have the details.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition.

Mountain Edition - July 17th, 2014

Jul 17, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

It’s been a busy summer in the Roaring Fork Valley so far. For some communities, it’s an important economic boost.

The U.S. Justice Department fines Citigroup for misconduct that helped fuel the recession. We talk to Colorado’s US Attorney, who was part of the investigation.

Colorado names Carbondale a creative district candidate. Turns out, much of the town’s economy is centered around ingenuity.

We’ll head to a shooting range near Basalt, where a group of women are learning to cast...and blast.

And, it’s the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act this year. We’ll introduce you to a group of women who fought to protect the Maroon Bells/Snowmass area.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

50 Years Of Wilderness: The "Maroon Belles"

Jul 17, 2014
Meredith Ogilby/Wilderness Workshop

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act and, in special series, we're focusing on one protected area in our backyard, the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness.

It took the work of three tireless women to expand protection in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness near Aspen. In 1964, just the high mountain peaks became wilderness. So, the women, called the “Maroon Belles,” worked to more than double the size of the preserved area. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen tells their story.