Nancy Pfister

A judge in Aspen has allowed prosecutors to delay the first major hearing in the case of Nancy Pfister. Three people are charged with murdering Pfister months ago, and were scheduled to appear in court next week. Now that won’t happen until later this month.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.  

Joining us today are Carolyn Sackariason, Editor of the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone, former editor of and now columnist for the Aspen Times.

This month special taxing districts are holding elections for their boards.  Two are getting a lot of attention because of what happened in their last elections.  Critics are running for seats this time. 

One of those is the Crown Mountain Recreation District. Also facing a shuffle is the Carbondale Fire District.

This week legal wrangling continued over opening files in the Nancy Pfister murder case.

Today we talk with Aspen Times reporter Scott Condon about a squabble in the valley’s environmental activist community.

And, there was more evidence this week that marijuana is getting respectable….The Colorado Symphony Orchestra wants pot smokers to shed the tie-dye and clip on a cumber bun. 

Valley Roundup - April 24th, 2014

Apr 25, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.  

Joining us today are Curtis Wackerle from the Aspen Daily News and Michael Miracle from Aspen Sojourner magazine..

This week, Aspen City Council gave the cold shoulder to the much debated hydro-electric power plant proposal.  The city will instead pursue other renewable sources of power.

Council also agreed in principle this week that Aspen’s core should be allowed to get louder at night than current noise rules allow.

Also today some case files in the Nancy Pfister murder are opened but they reveal little.  And more construction and an upgraded credit rating provide more evidence that Aspen has emerged from the great recession.

A judge schedules the first major court hearings in the Nancy Pfister murder case. Three people are charged with conspiring to kill the Aspen native.

A new study shows there may be a link between natural gas development and defects that develop in a child before birth.

Has Aspen become too expensive for the middle class? We talk to local residents and young business owners to find out how they’re making it work.

Finally, a local theatrical group - the Hudson Reed Ensemble is already preparing for summer. It’ll bring back a favorite event - Shakespeare in the Park.

Pitkin County Sheriff's Office

In about six weeks, the Aspen community will hear details on what allegedly happened when Nancy Pfister died. A judge has scheduled the first major court hearings for three people charged with committing murder against Pfister. That was decided in court yesterday-- and some aspects of the case actually parallel the high profile Aurora shooting case on the Front Range. 

Editor's note: you can read the newly released arrest warrants and charges here, here, and here.

There’s lots of questions surrounding the death of Nancy Pfister. The Aspenite passed away in February, and details have been locked up tight so far… by the Pitkin County Sheriff’s office and the courts. The Pitkin County Coroner released a report Wednesday, April 16th, about how Pfister died. Coroner Steve Ayers says a forensic pathologist did the autopsy, and described the findings in a short statement.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

 

The murder in February of Aspen native Nancy Pfister was unusual in many regards, chief among them that murders are very rare in Aspen.  It has been unusual in how the prosecution and law enforcement refused to reveal details of the arrests of three people charged in the homicide.  As the case moves slowly forward it will could also stand out for how much money is being spent to find justice for Nancy Pfister.  Initial review shows the costs are already into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Valley Roundup - April 11th, 2014

Apr 11, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.  

Joining us today are Carolyn Sackariason from the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone from the Aspen Times.

This week, the prosecution’s case against the accused in the Nancy Pfister murder moves closer to being unsealed.

Commercial Real Estate in downtown Aspen is moving and with it come the closure of the Ute City Restaurant and the sale of the building that’s home to the Aspen Daily News.

Also today keeping things behind closed doors…Aspen Valley Hospital calls off what some say was a stealth board of directors election

On the Download with Rob St. Mary malware and heartbleeds, from hospitals to Google searches it seems nothing is secure anymore.

Defense attorneys in the Nancy Pfister case are digging through lots of evidence.

Spring snow showers have boosted snowpack to above-average levels and forecasts are calling for high river flows this spring.

A Western Slope lawmaker is proposing Colorado get its own firefighting fleet of airplanes and helicopters.

And, wildfire is on the minds of local officials who are planning ahead after devastating fires in recent years, on the Front Range.

Suicide is getting attention in the Aspen community, after several deaths this winter.

And, we have some fun with what could be the Upper Valley’s first home inspired hybrid.

It’s still not clear when to expect the first significant court hearings in the alleged murder of Aspen native Nancy Pfister. Attorneys, the prosecution, and a district Judge met yesterday, Wednesday April 2nd, to put those hearings on the calendar… but now that’s been pushed back to Wednesday, April 23rd.

Pages