NPR

Ron Cogswell/Flickr

Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, told lawmakers in a statement on Monday that he "did not collude... with any foreign government."

New York Times columnist David Leonhardt spoke last week at the Aspen Institute about the state of journalism and why it’s important. This morning on Valley Roundup, listen to an excerpt of his talk with Aspen Institute Vice President Elliot Gerson.

You can hear the full "Future of News" discussion on this website.

 

Donald Trump Jr. tweeted images of emails regarding his 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer on Tuesday. An intermediary said he could connect Trump Jr. with people who had information "that would incriminate Hillary [Clinton]... and would be very useful to your father." Trump Jr. agreed to the meeting, which former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Trump son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner also attended in June 2016.

Ross Kribbs

Aspen Public Radio was proud to present our second annual Lawn Party on June 29. The event featured Joshua Johnson of 1A.

A big thanks to our sponsors for making this event a success. Sponsors included Alpine Bank, Red Brick Center for the Arts, King & Cook, which provided amazing barbecue, and Aspen Brewing Co., Suerte Tequia and Stripped Mixers, which provided libations.

Architect of the Capitol

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee at 2:30pm ET today, as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election. 

The nation's top legal officer is set to go before Congress on Tuesday to try to defuse a bomb that the former FBI director dropped into his lap.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee less than one week after James Comey told the committee he could not discuss openly certain information about Sessions' recusal from the investigation into Russia's election meddling last year.

Updated at 5:06 p.m. ET

Former FBI Director James Comey told the Senate Intelligence Committee that he believed he was fired by President Trump over the growing Russia investigation and that other arguments by the White House were "lies, plain and simple."

Chelsea Beck/NPR

Before his election, back in October, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump laid out a 100 Day Action Plan. He called it his Contract With The American Voter. Among other things, it called for the full repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, suspension of immigration from certain "terror-prone regions," and the lifting of "roadblocks" to let "infrastructure projects like the Keystone Pipeline move forward."

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Aspen Public Radio’s news director Carolyn Sackariason explained why she’s so passionate about supporting public media.

Show your support by making a pledge today!

Aspen Public Radio’s downvalley reporter Wyatt Orme explained why he’s so passionate about supporting public media.

Meg Kelly/NPR

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

SEASON 2 | LAUNCH PARTY

 JUNE 16 | 1PM HOOCH | ASPEN 

BELOW MEAT AND CHEESE  

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC    

Celebrate the return of Invisibiliia with the first-of-its-kind National Listening Event! Bring a lunch from upstairs or a brown bag, grab a drink below and cozy up to hear Episode One of Invisibilila, Season 2 before the official drop June 17. On a single day – June 16, 2016 – member stations and listeners across the country will gather for fun, intimate Listening Parties. Join us! The bartender will be waiting.

This week on Cross Currents is from the archives with NPR Foreign Correspondent Mike Shuster from the Given Institute on Iran, China, North Korea, and Syria. 

Rob St. Mary

On Saturday, August 9th, Ken Rudin aka "The Political Junkie" shared his insights on the upcoming elections, how Colorado plays into the equation, and his love of political buttons.

Rudin was interviewed by former NPR editor, and current Aspen Public Radio board member, Loren Jenkins. "The Political Junkie" also took questions from the audience at the 3rd Street Center in Carbondale.

Ken Rudin is one of America’s foremost experts in politics and campaign history. He focuses on all aspects of politics, from presidential elections—with the primaries, national conventions, debates and general election—to the races for the House, Senate and state governors. He has analyzed every congressional race in the nation since 1984.

Ken began his NPR career in 1991. He has worked with correspondents and reporters both at the network and member-station level. From 2006-2013, Ken was regularly heard on of the Nation in the weekly, and very popular, Political Junkie segment. He also helped create It’s All Politics the podcast, which ran for seven years. In his Political Junkie weekly column— which first appeared on The Washington  Post website before coming to NPR—Ken previewed the politics of the week and explored campaign history, strategy, trivia and lore, along with his well-known ScuttleButton contest.

For most of the past 20 years, Ken was the eyes and ears of NPR’s political coverage in his position as NPR political editor and resident “Political Junkie.” As a political junkie for many decades, Ken has one of the most extensive collections of campaign buttons in the country, a collection that now surpasses 70,000 items.

National Public Radio

If the name Philip Reeves sounds familiar, it’s because you’ve heard lots of NPR stories from him over the years. Reeves is an international reporter now based in Pakistan, but he’s spent time in Iraq and, in the 1990’s, he was in Moscow. That was before NPR, when Reeves filed stories for a British newspaper. He spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. She asked Reeves what his sense is for what’s going on now between Russia and Ukraine.

Join NPR's Philip Reeves in Conversation

Mar 5, 2014

Moscow… Ukraine…Crimea…Gaza…The West Bank…Chechnya…Iraq…Afghanistan…India: Philip Reeves has covered them all for NPR and he’s coming to the Roaring Fork Valley! Philip Reeves and Loren Jenkins will dissect the complicated, messy, noisy and violent hot spots of our planet.  

His Challenge: Listen to Every NPR Station

Dec 13, 2013

His name is Michael Arvizu and he has undertaken an auditory challenge of Herculean proportions. The broadcast journalism student at California State University – Northridge plans to listen to every NPR station in America.