Pitkin County

In an effort to monitor smell at a marijuana greenhouse near Basalt, Pitkin County has hired an “odor ranger.” He’s been tracking pot aroma for more than a month. It’s an attempt at taming one aspect of a new industry. But, few rules exist in Colorado around smell and marijuana. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

It’s mid-day along Highway 82. Ryan Randolph looks both ways and runs across the busy road. He’s in front of High Valley Farms.

pitkincounty.com

The Pitkin County Commissioners gave initial support last week for an updated Emergency Operations Plan. It details how the county is more ready than ever before to handle large-scale disasters. 

The last update was in 2012. Since then, the county has developed a Type Four Incident Management Team and fifteen support teams. These groups are made up of more than 200 highly-trained public safety officers and civilians. They would jump into action in a major disaster, like a wildfire, flooding or multiple bombs. Valerie MacDonald is the Pitkin County Emergency Manager.

Marci Krivonen

Local veterans are concerned about planned construction near a memorial site in downtown Aspen. They fear work on a new county building will impact the Roaring Fork Veterans Memorial. Local vets and county staff have been in discussions on how to preserve the site, which some say is sacred. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Vietnam veteran Dan Glidden remembers how the Roaring Fork Veterans Memorial came to be. It was the mid 1980’s and the Pitkin County commissioners agreed to dedicate a site near the courthouse.

Aspen Journalism

Pitkin County is drawing up comments for the Forest Service on a proposed replacement of Lift 1A on Aspen Mountain. 

Tracy Olson/Flickr

  Pitkin County has been spending millions of dollars on medical care for its workers. That’s dropped dramatically in recent years. Pitkin County is projected to spend more than $3.6 million in the 2015 calendar year, a significant drop from previous years.

LIFT-UP gets big boost to open larger Aspen food pantry

Nov 17, 2015

  A local nonprofit will receive a more than $28,000 increase to its county funding in order to serve families in need in the Aspen area. Morgan Neely has the details.  

 

With seven area food pantries, LIFT-UP, based in Rifle, provides meals for thousands of valley residents every year. And now, with the help of Pitkin County’s Healthy Community Fund, Lift-up’s upgraded Aspen center will be able to provide more food, and a better variety of food, to families and individuals in need of temporary assistance.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Parker Knight

About one in ten kids in Pitkin County are living in poverty. That’s according to a statewide study discussed in Aspen last week. Officials with the Colorado Children’s Campaign visited with parents, elected leaders and child care workers about their latest findings. Shirley Ritter is a child advocate who runs Kids First — an Aspen center subsidized by taxpayers. She spoke with Marci Krivonen.

Shirley Ritter directs Kids First for the city of Aspen. 

Marci Krivonen

With the legislative session about two months away, State Senator Kerry Donovan is preparing her legislative agenda. She represents Pitkin, Eagle and other Western Slope counties. This session, she says finding ways to provide internet in rural areas will be a top priority. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.


  

Voters have approved question 3A in a 69 to 31 percent margin, which continues a property tax to fund the Aspen School District. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

 

Polls in Garfield, Eagle and Pitkin counties closed about 30 minutes ago. Now it’s up to the clerks to tally up the votes, with final results expected between 10:30 and midnight.

Pitkin County Clerk Janice Vos Caudill  reports that as of 6 p.m., just over 5,100 ballots were received, and 360 individualls voted in person at the Aspen Jewish Community Center, totaling 455 in-person voters.

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