Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

A Snowmass Town councilman faces a felony charge after allegedly trashing a jail cell.

Aspenites will probably vote on a proposed affordable lodge.

A judge considers whether the Aspen Skiing Company is at fault for a mudslide that damaged a home.

We take a look at diversity in the Roaring Fork Valley arts community.

We also get a tour of an innovative marijuana grow facility in the Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Paul Downey

The Great Recession may be in the rearview mirror, but it left poverty in its wake. Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department reports more people living in poverty. Director of the Department Nan Sundeen says a quarter of residents earn slightly more than federal poverty wages. So, many single adults are making just $23,000 a year. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Nan Sundeen is director of Pitkin County Health and Human Services. Next week, we’ll examine access to health care for the poor.

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

A couple that lives in a penthouse in downtown Aspen now has to share the building’s entrance with their neighbors. As a result, their property value decreased $1.3 million, a judge has ruled.

There’s more debate around the live debate that Aspen Public Radio broadcast with city council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland.

Marci Krivonen

A non profit in the Mid-valley is ramping up for growing season. This will be the second year Growing Food Forward uses gardening to help feed the region’s hungry. The organization grows crops for area food pantries, distributes food and seeds to low-income families, and works with schools that have high numbers of kids who use the “free and reduced lunch” program. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Kim Wille, the founder and executive director of the non-profit. She says they manage more than 35 gardens from Aspen to Rifle.


A book that looks at environmental crises, immigration and social inequality in the Roaring Fork Valley is being taught in college classrooms across the country. The Slums of Aspen was published by New York University Press in 2011. Now instructors of environmental sociology are using it at schools from Los Angeles to Boston. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Creative Commons/Flickr/eflon

Men are making more money than women working in the Roaring Fork Valley. But, the differences vary depending on the county. A new report shows a woman earns 80-cents for every dollar a man makes in Colorado. 

In Pitkin County, on average, a man earns $54,000 a year compared to $47,000 for a woman. In Garfield County, the disparity is greater. A man earns $50,000 annually, compared to a woman’s earnings of $37,000.