public health

This spring, Karen Koenemann was hired as Pitkin County’s first public health director.

courtesy photo / Pitkin County

Pitkin County has a team ready to set up a temporary public health facility if an outbreak were to occur in the valley. And now, a reorganized medical surge trailer is user friendly for anyone who that task might fall on.

When it comes to health, communities in the Midvalley struggle with binge drinking and, just slightly, with obesity. Public health officials are sharing results of a survey with local governments. Jordana Sabella is the Public Health Planner for Pitkin and Western Eagle Counties. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Jordana Sabella is Public Health Planner for Pitkin and Western Eagle Counties. 

Your Morning News - February 5th, 2015

Feb 5, 2015

Calls Come for Increased Vaccination Rates

Pitkin County’s public health clinic is seeing a rise in the number of people requesting vaccinations for measles. The majority of calls are from parents checking on their children’s vaccine history and adults seeking vaccinations.

The local spike in interest comes after a measles outbreak started in California and spread to fourteen states. Pitkin County Public Health Director Liz Stark says she’s happy to see the uptick in interest.

“We are definitely being impacted by what’s going on in the country. And, the positive thing is that the calls we’re getting are from people interested in making sure they’re vaccinated and up to date on their vaccines.”

She thinks the Roaring Fork Valley is generally in favor of vaccines. Five percent of students in Aspen’s School District are not vaccinated.

“That means that only five percent of the children have opted out of vaccines for either religious or personal exemption. That’s really good compared to other communities around the country.”

But, Colorado as a whole has a low vaccination rate. The Denver Post reports, the state is dead last for vaccinating kindergartners for measles, mumps and rubella. The Roaring Fork School District with schools in Basalt, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs did not respond to a request for vaccination rates.

Marci Krivonen

When it comes to how to regulate recreational marijuana, there are more questions than answers. That was the conclusion at a Pitkin County Commissioner’s meeting Tuesday, where officials discussed public safety and environmental health surrounding pot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s been nearly nine months since recreational marijuana shops in Colorado started selling pot to adults 21 and older. Now, Pitkin County is examining problems and concerns that have cropped up.