recreational marijuana

On Tuesday, most voters said “no” to big tax increases locally and statewide. A CSU political science professor says anti-tax activists are growing in their influence.

One measure that did pass taxes retail marijuana to raise money for schools. As pot becomes more available in the state, one youth non-profit is worried.

A warming climate is changing ecosystems in the Roaring Fork Valley and one local government is using open spaces to gather data on what’s happening.

A new art display at the Wyly Art Center in Basalt features the work of a self-taught painter.  Despite being silenced by Alzheimer’s, Winifred Wyman is speaking through paint.

Also today on the Road to Sochi, Aspen native Simi Hamilton works to make the 2014 winter Olympic team. The Nordic ski racer specializes in sprinting.

That’s coming up on Mountain Edition.

Businesses currently selling medical marijuana will be allowed to sell recreational pot on January 1st, if they’re willing to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for a license. Dispensary owners say the added business would be a boon.

The story of Lance Armstrong’s fall from grace continues to unfold. In a new book, two Wall Street Journal reporters explore the financial underpinnings of how and why the cyclist cheated.

A coal mine over the mountains near Paonia recently laid off many of its employees. The layoffs and that could hurt local communities.

And, we’ll examine at coal mining across the country and look into the challenges the industry’s currently facing.

Finally, we introduce you to a young female snowboarder looking to make the Olympic team in a new event - snowboard slopestyle.

It’s been a big news week and one story with big impacts locally is the federal government shutdown. We take a look at what it means for the Roaring Fork Valley.

Obamacare hit the internet on Tuesday, turns out, health care plans coordinated by Colorado are way more expensive in mountain towns.

After massive floods walloped oil and gas operations, we hear ideas about making sure oil and gas operations are better protected down the road.

Local officials had to decide by Tuesday whether to take steps to allow retail marijuana in the Roaring Fork Valley. Many have decided to delay their verdict.

We get an update from one of the ten Aspen-area athletes hoping to compete in the upcoming Winter Olympics in Russia.

And finally, tamales are a humble Latin American dish with deep, historical roots. They’re the main fare at an upcoming Roaring Fork Valley event.

http://kotaku.com/5605942/gamer-with-stolen-credit-card-leads-cops-to-parents-pot

Today, Tuesday October 1st, marks one of the first deadlines for communities in how they choose to regulate retail marijuana. Colorado towns and counties are supposed to decide whether they’re going to allow the growing, buying and selling of recreational pot next year… And many communities around the state have decided to put their decision on hold.

President Barack Obama made an announcement today about the battle in Congress.

One of the first deadlines for so called retail marijuana is fast approaching. By next Tuesday, October 1st, local communities are supposed to decide if they’re going to allow the pot to be grown, sold, and otherwise available in the community in the coming year.

“It’s pretty much going to be clustered in just a handful of areas. Denver and Boulder I think are the big cities, and then there’s mountain communities as well.”

John Ingold is a reporter for the Denver Post.  He’s keeping an eye on how the state is getting ready for retail marijuana and says even pot-friend places like Denver questions remain.

“There is concern about advertising, distances from schools, zoning, those kinds of things.”

Aspen Public Radio takes a look at a unique documentary showing at the Aspen Filmfest. It takes viewers inside one of the nation’s busiest emergency rooms where patients often wait hours for care.

And on the Download this week, we explore glitches with new iPhones, brainwashing kids to pay for movies & music and other unusual ventures in education.

Elise Thatcher

Colorado is the first state to finalize the details on how to regulate recreational marijuana. The rules came out Monday, September 9th.  Here in the Roaring Fork Valley, the Pitkin County Commission is taking some early steps for figuring out how to work out recreational… or so-called “retail”... marijuana. They met yesterday, Tuesday September 10th, to explore what comes first.

Flickr/Dave H

The federal government yesterday (Thurs., 8-29-13) said it won’t sue to stop recreational marijuana use in Colorado and Washington. The news comes a little over a week after Garfield County commissioners voted to ban recreational marijuana businesses in certain areas of the county. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth spoke to one of the commissioners who voted in favor of the ban and filed this report.  

Garfield County Commissioner John Martin says the federal government’s latest stance on recreational marijuana has left him feeling somewhat confused.

Marci Krivonen

This fall voters across Colorado will decide how recreational marijuana should be taxed. The state legislature referred a special sales tax and an excise tax to the ballot. As Bente Birkeland reports, while the initiative has broad support, there are some who worry it goes too far.

Flickr/Coleen Whitfield

Recreational pot users now know what to expect when marijuana retailers open their doors in 2014. Yesterday, Colorado state officials released details regarding the rules and regulations marijuana retailers must follow. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth reports.  

Right now, it’s legal to grow and possess certain amounts of pot for recreational use, but you’re not going to find it on the shelves of your corner convenience store quite yet.

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