RFTA

Courtesy of RFTA.com

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority bought into a solar array last year, but the forecast doesn’t look so bright.

Aspen Public Radio News

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority and a statewide advocacy group spoke to Colorado’s transit needs yesterday.

Elizabeth Stewart-Severy/Aspen Public Radio

Cyclists and runners along the Rio Grande Trail are seeing a different kind of wildlife this month. The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority has hired a herd of goats to eat weeds along the path from Glenwood Springs to Emma.

Today marks the start of the fall schedule for the Roaring Fork Valley Transportation Authority. This means that local valley bus services will reduce in frequency and will not run as late at night and on weekends.

snowpeak/Flickr/Creative Commons

  Buses to the Maroon Bells will be up and running Saturday for the summer season, but tickets and parking will be more expensive.

Valley Roundup 1-29-16

Jan 29, 2016

  Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

Joining me this week are Jill Beathard, editor of the Snowmass Sun, Randy Essex, editor of the Glenwood Post Independent and Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News.

Municipal elections are a few months away in towns throughout the valley and along the I-70 corridor. New Castle is entering new territory with the possibility of multiple recalls.

Aspen in the environmental spotlight worldwide

Dec 23, 2015

  Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron was recently at the climate talks in Paris. One of the takeaways was that the Aspen community may be small on the world stage but its environmentalism has the spotlight.

Skadron says he was surprised by how many leaders knew not only about Aspen but were familiar with its environmental initiatives. Skadron says Aspen’s Canary Initiative, transportation plan and affordable housing program all serve as efforts more easily done on a local level than on a national one.

Elise Thatcher

  Starting Saturday, residents in need of a ride to Denver can snag a weekend trip on the Bustang service. CDOT unveiled the memorably named bus service this summer, but has been hesitant to add trips on Saturday and Sunday.

Mountain Edition - November 5th, 2015

Nov 5, 2015

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Voters in Aspen this week turned down a new lodge proposed on Main Street. Now, the developer is moving forward with an alternative.

With fresh snow, mountain roads are closing and buses are getting outfitted for skis.

Western Slope officials are making their message clear about the statewide water plan.

And, a proposed development in El Jebel has officers realizing there isn’t enough law enforcement in the area.

Courtesy Roaring Fork Transportation Authority

Sixty-nine new parking spaces are being created at the Carbondale Park and Ride, along with additional bike parking and restroom facilities for drivers and the public. RFTA facility director Mike Hermes says he hopes this will help fill a need, at least for a year or two.

Elise Thatcher

Public transportation in the Roaring Fork Valley could include light rail once again. The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority is reconsidering the service. RFTA is putting long term goals into something called an Integrated Transportation Plan.

Elise Thatcher

More workers at the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority may be joining a union. Sixteen operations supervisors with RFTA say they’re interested in either starting their own chapter, or joining one created this spring by full time bus drivers. About half of supervisors also spend some working hours behind the wheel.

 

Pitkin County explores solar power

May 21, 2015
Creative Commons/Flickr/Oregon Dept. of Transportation

Pitkin county staff will explore using rooftops and other government property to install solar panels. County commissioners this week approved a funding request for a feasibility study. 

The county will spend between $15,000 and $25,000 to locate beneficial sites for solar and find out how much electricity could be generated. Right now, the county consumes 1.3 megawatt hours per year and it’s not offset by any significant renewable efforts. County Engineer G.R. Fielding says now is a good time to pursue solar.

Elise Thatcher

A new bus drivers’ union in the area is stretching its wings. Full time drivers with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority voted in February to start a local chapter of a national transit worker union. Ed Cortez is the President and business agent for the Aspen Local 774 of the Amalgamated Transit Union He sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher to talk about where the union is now.

Aspen bike sharing system sees growth in second year

Mar 25, 2015
Marci Krivonen

In May, the bike sharing service WE-cycle will reopen for the summer season. The Aspen-based service is seeing success. WE-cycle provides bikes for short-term users at stations around town. The idea is to reduce car trips with the service.

2014 was WE-cycle's second year of operation. The organization saw a 76 percent jump in ridership compared to its inaugural year. Mirte Mallory with WE-cycle says many users live Downvalley, and use the bikes as the final leg of their commute.

rfta.com

Now that funding is in place to renovate the Rubey Park bus depot in downtown Aspen, a public outreach effort is starting. The City will warn people about construction.

The $9.3 million renovation project will modernize Rubey Park and fix things like cracking concrete and cramped bus parking. The construction project will renovate the interior of the existing clock tower building and add two buildings to either side of it. Parking for buses will change too.

Facebook/RFTA

There's few unions in the Roaring Fork Valley-- and now, there's another.Full-time bus drivers with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority have voted to unionize. Ballots were counted in Denver on Wednesday by the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. The final count didn’t begin until the mail arrived late at Colorado’s labor agency after 3pm. Heavy snow had delayed the delivery. Driver Ed Cortez was waiting breathlessly, with a representative of the Amalgamated Transit Union.

Roaring Fork Transit Authority

Full time bus drivers with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority have voted to unionize. Ballots were counted in Denver today by the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. The agency has confirmed the results. 65 drivers voted for unionization, with 22 against.

Roaring Fork Transit Authority

Full time bus drivers for the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority are voting on whether to unionize. If approved, it would be the first time in more than a decade for drivers to be a part of a union. 

Ed Cortez was selected by other bus drivers to lead the union vote. He’s been a full time driver for two and a half years, and describes what it was like getting behind the wheel. 

“Well, initially I was very nervous, very intimidated. Slowly but surely I realized that I really loved driving.”

A big reason is getting to know riders from all backgrounds-- from regular folks to politicians.

Your Morning News - February 9th, 2015

Feb 9, 2015

West Slope Back On Drought Index

In the dry month of January, snowpack levels in nearly every river basin in Colorado declined. In the Roaring Fork Valley, not only did the amount of snow diminish but drought conditions returned. 

The U.S. Drought Monitor released Thursday puts the Western Slope in the “abnormally dry” category, including the majority of Eagle and Pitkin Counties and all of Garfield County. “Abnormally dry” is the least severe of five categories.

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