The Road to Sochi

3:28pm

Thu November 14, 2013
Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition - November 14th, 2013

Energy planners gathered in Carbondale this week to compare notes and strategize about funding.

The Town of Basalt approves a home for senior citizens. Now, there’s an effort underway to recruit residents.

Snowmass Village takes a stab at cutting greenhouse gas emissions. The town has some of the highest per capita in the nation.

An independent study finds the Roaring Fork Valley’s mass transit system means big savings for residents.

We find out whether Lance Armstrong had anything to do with death threats against the national agency to prevent doping.

We’ll wrap up with the latest from our Road to Sochi series. Olympic hopeful Meg Olenick aims to be one of the first compete in a sport new to the winter games.

3:28pm

Thu November 7, 2013
Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition - November 7th, 2013

On Tuesday, most voters said “no” to big tax increases locally and statewide. A CSU political science professor says anti-tax activists are growing in their influence.

One measure that did pass taxes retail marijuana to raise money for schools. As pot becomes more available in the state, one youth non-profit is worried.

A warming climate is changing ecosystems in the Roaring Fork Valley and one local government is using open spaces to gather data on what’s happening.

A new art display at the Wyly Art Center in Basalt features the work of a self-taught painter.  Despite being silenced by Alzheimer’s, Winifred Wyman is speaking through paint.

Also today on the Road to Sochi, Aspen native Simi Hamilton works to make the 2014 winter Olympic team. The Nordic ski racer specializes in sprinting.

That’s coming up on Mountain Edition.

3:57pm

Thu October 31, 2013
Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition - October 31st, 2013

A weekend RFTA bus rollover that injured 11 people is under investigation. We have the latest.

The fire district that serves Carbondale is asking voters for a tax increase. The chief says it’s needed to fight increasingly intense fires. Opponents say it costs too much.

Snowmass Village voters have a different tax question. It would pay for improvements to aging infrastructure like leaks and cracks in sewer pipes.

A Mid-Valley non-profit is concerned about the health of the Fryingpan River. Flows were down over the summer… thanks to the drought last winter... and a study will determine how that affected fish.

The Aspen Skiing Company is recognized with an award for commitment to the arts. Aspen Public Radio’s Roger Adams talks to the Ski-Co’s Managing Partners, Jim and Paula Crown.

Finally, an Aspen ski jumper is hoping to make the Olympic team in the Nordic combined. We profile Michael Ward in the latest Road to Sochi segment.

3:27pm

Thu October 17, 2013
Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition - October 17th, 2013

Businesses currently selling medical marijuana will be allowed to sell recreational pot on January 1st, if they’re willing to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for a license. Dispensary owners say the added business would be a boon.

The story of Lance Armstrong’s fall from grace continues to unfold. In a new book, two Wall Street Journal reporters explore the financial underpinnings of how and why the cyclist cheated.

A coal mine over the mountains near Paonia recently laid off many of its employees. The layoffs and that could hurt local communities.

And, we’ll examine at coal mining across the country and look into the challenges the industry’s currently facing.

Finally, we introduce you to a young female snowboarder looking to make the Olympic team in a new event - snowboard slopestyle.

3:25pm

Thu October 10, 2013
Mountain Edition

Mountain Edition - October 10th, 2013

The government shutdown trudges on but Pitkin County is working to alleviate the pain by increasing access to a local attraction on federal land.

A proposal for funding public education has been called historic by Colorado’s governor. But, the ballot measure could stretch wallets.

The Aspen Skiing Company hopes to catch the eye of up and coming skiers from certain Asian countries.

And, changes may be in store if the USA Pro Challenge bike race returns to the upper Roaring Fork Valley next year. We talk with an economist who says big sporting events may not mean more money for the towns hosting them.

Finally, we get an update on local athletes training for the upcoming Winter Olympics in Russia.

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