Science

Marci Krivonen

A laboratory that tests retail marijuana is opening in Carbondale. It’s one of just two such Colorado labs west of the Continental Divide. The scientists who run GreenHill Laboratories say they will be testing for potency and they’ll be one of the first to test for contaminants. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Inside Greenhill Laboratories in Carbondale, Lab Owner Hilary Glass motions toward her equipment.

Glass: "These are my incubators. I need about eight more."

On today's show, Chip Comins, President and CEO of the American Renewable Energy Institute on this year's ARE Day Summit, August 10-13 in Aspen.

And Jackie Francis, Executive Director of the Aspen Science Center on Sunday's ASC Street Fair in Paepcke Park.

The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES) has been an advocate for environmental education for over 45 years. Arin Trook is the Education Director, and is in charge of the in-school ACES programs in schools between between Aspen and Rifle. Trook explains the importance of environmental education and his  goals for future expansion.

In an effort to increase awareness and promote further academic understanding and research on global climate change, the Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) has teamed up with Colorado Mountain College to create an online database titled From the Horses Mouth. This resource is geared toward high school and undergraduate science classes. The database contains video and research from workshops and conferences hosted by AGCI. The subjects range from butterflies to atmospheric chemistry. 

Elise Osenga, a Research Associate for AGCI, and James Arnott, AGCI's Program Director, discuss the new database, its importance in the scientific community, and ways AGCI is looking forward and preparing for the uncertain future of climate change. 

Visit From the Horses Mouth or learn more about AGCI

Climate Change and Conflict and the Media

Aug 9, 2013
Solomon Hsiang, et al / Science, 2013

ROGER ADAMS, HOST: Global temperatures on are the rise, and scientists predict that that will make for more extreme weather events—things like higher temperature spikes, drought, and more intense storms. And a team of researchers has made headlines by quantifying how much increased violence comes from extreme shifts in climate.

Aspen Public Radio’s science reporter Ellis Robinson, joins us on Valley Roundup. Hey Ellis.

ELLIS ROBINSON, REPORTER: Hey Roger.

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