Science

Mike Simmons, Chairman of the Aspen Science Center board, and Jackie Francis, Executive Director of the Aspen Science Center, share their vision for the future of the center. The organization hopes to build a science museum where visitors (both locals and tourists) can explore, interact, and discover. 

Learn more about the Aspen Science Center and their summer programs at www.AspenScienceCenter.org

This summer the Aspen Science Center is offering a new program in conjunction with the Aspen Music Festival and School. The Science of Music is a four-part series of lectures and demonstrations. Alan Fletcher, President of the Aspen Music Festival and a board member of the science center, is leading the project. He gives listeners a sneak-peak into this exciting new series.   

Mike Simmons is the Chairman of the Aspen Science Center Board. He explains why hands-on experiments are the best way to educate and inspire people who are interested in science and learning about the world around them. Joining Simmons is Jackie Francis, the center's Executive Director. This week, we discuss the center's multitude of summer events for all ages and interests. 

Learn more about the Aspen Science Center's summer programs and events at www.AspenScienceCenter.org

 In 1990, the Aspen Science Center was created as a horticultural project at the Aspen Community School. First known as The Verena Project, the idea soon blossomed into a larger, science-focused non-profit organization. George Stranahan is a co-founder and board member of the center, and shares the history and evolution of the organization. 

Learn more about the Aspen Science Center at www.AspenScienceCenter.org

Allison Johnson

Two schools in the Midvalley are welcoming new school administrators. The Roaring Fork School District announced new principals at Basalt High School and Crystal River Elementary School in Carbondale. 

Matthew Koenigsknecht will lead Crystal River Elementary School. He was a language arts teacher in Denver and managed a summer program at Basalt Elementary School.

Peter Mueller will take the reigns at Basalt High School. He works for The Nature Conservancy and served as principal at Telluride public schools. Mueller also worked in Evergreen, Colorado at a private school.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the final episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear about something called Doctor in a Box.

“It’s telemedicine that you can have in the privacy of your own home, or you can actually take the kit with you while you’re traveling and have consistent access to health care.”

The idea comes from a firm who also came up with a bike you probably saw on facebook or twitter last year. Yes, we’ll hear where the Denny Bike is now.

feministing.com

Good afternoon you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fourth episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear from a health expert who noticed patients spend a lot of time in hospitals without much to do and how that changes when there is art and music in the building.

“I witnessed moments where patients would listen to the concert, and that could be the last beautiful thing they’ve heard.”

Marci Krivonen

A laboratory that tests retail marijuana is opening in Carbondale. It’s one of just two such Colorado labs west of the Continental Divide. The scientists who run GreenHill Laboratories say they will be testing for potency and they’ll be one of the first to test for contaminants. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Inside Greenhill Laboratories in Carbondale, Lab Owner Hilary Glass motions toward her equipment.

Glass: "These are my incubators. I need about eight more."

On today's show, Chip Comins, President and CEO of the American Renewable Energy Institute on this year's ARE Day Summit, August 10-13 in Aspen.

And Jackie Francis, Executive Director of the Aspen Science Center on Sunday's ASC Street Fair in Paepcke Park.

Climate Change and Conflict and the Media

Aug 9, 2013
Solomon Hsiang, et al / Science, 2013

ROGER ADAMS, HOST: Global temperatures on are the rise, and scientists predict that that will make for more extreme weather events—things like higher temperature spikes, drought, and more intense storms. And a team of researchers has made headlines by quantifying how much increased violence comes from extreme shifts in climate.

Aspen Public Radio’s science reporter Ellis Robinson, joins us on Valley Roundup. Hey Ellis.

ELLIS ROBINSON, REPORTER: Hey Roger.

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