Science

Coal Mines Provide Enticing Green Energy Source

Jun 14, 2013
Credit Kathy Browning - Flickr

One local company is already taking advantage of methane capture at coal mines. The Aspen Skiing Company last year, invested in a project that generates energy from methane at a mine near Paonia.  Their trailblazing will set the stage for other groups to try out similar projects. Aspen Public Radio’s Ellis Robinson reports.

Digging for Dust Data

Jun 11, 2013
Center for Snow and Avalanche Studies

If you’ve ventured out on a hot day wearing dark clothing you know that within a short time you're soaked with sweat. Similarly, when a blanket of dust settles on snow, it acts the same way - the snow sweats or melts. The result is a rapid melting of snow.  Aspen Public Radio’s Science Reporter Ellis Robinson has more.
 

Marci Krivonen

  As schools across the country work to improve students’ comprehension of math and science, one district in the region is taking those lessons to the sky. A new after-school program at the Aspen School District is using hands-on learning to churn out a new generation of aerospace engineers and pilots. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more. 

Two more speakers from this year's Aspen Ideas Fest:

* Cassie Conley, Planetary Protection Officer with NASA

* Dan Gross, President of Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence
 

Marci Krivonen

The Roaring Fork Valley is no Silicon Valley. But, it is home to a growing innovative computer tech company. The Basalt-basediOmounts designs and distributes sturdy stands to hold smart phones and tablets. The company does most of its business online and has furnished local lodges, like the Hotel Jerome, with its products.

Turns out, iOmounts isn’t the only business of its kind in Colorado. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

 

More details are available on what happened during the April 20th deadly avalanche on Loveland Pass. It was the worst accident of its kind in more than a half a century. The Colorado Avalanche Information Center released their final report on Wednesday April 24th. In it are some painful details--like the lone survivor waiting four hours to be dug out, and the slide being powerful enough to wreck car. Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher talks with CAIC Executive Director Ethan Greene.

Marci Krivonen

Last month the Obama Administration laid out a plan to help plants and animals deal with the impacts of climate change. Already, polar bears are losing sea ice and waterfowl are flying south weeks later than decades before. The plan lays out strategies on how to help animals survive these changes.

In Aspen, a group of citizen scientists hope to do the same thing. They’re getting trained on how to recognize and record changes to the environment. The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies is behind the effort. The group hopes to make it easier to track changes.

Marci Krivonen

There’s a house in Old Snowmass unlike any other home in the Roaring Fork Valley, or in the world for that matter. The home Amory Lovins shares with his wife doesn’t have a furnace and it creates more energy than it uses.

Lovins is a scientist who founded Rocky Mountain Institute, an energy and environmental think tank. He’s become one of the world’s foremost thinkers on energy efficiency. And, he gets some of that inspiration from what he calls the “Banana Farm." Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

 

Pages