Snowmass Village

Krabloonik Overload?

Jan 22, 2014
Aspen Times

It has been hard in recent weeks to avoid news stories about the Krabloonik dog sledding operation in Snowmass.  The owner has been charged with animal cruelty and is due in court next month.  Media coverage has gone beyond these charges to include an inter-family dispute, the relationship between the company and Snowmass Village and it’s mayor.  The story has also had its share of tangled relationships and friendships involving members of the media.  Aspen Times Editor Rick Carroll, in an editorial this week called it a media orgy.  Carroll told us he is getting exasperated with the story.  He spoke with APR's Roger Adams.


gailschwartz.org

Lawmakers are meeting in Denver, as the legislative session ramps up. Already, bills targeting wildfire mitigation and renewable energy have been introduced. Senator Gail Schwartz of Snowmass Village is working on a number of bills during her last term in office. One aims to bring broadband internet access to remote and rural areas. The democrat is termed out after this year. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen sat down with her on Monday.

Creative Commons/Flickr/U.S. Army Environmental Command

New building codes meant to make commercial buildings in Snowmass Village greener, are set to take effect December 1st. The codes come after a report in 2009 showed the resort emitted six times more greenhouse gases than the national average. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A weekend RFTA bus rollover that injured 11 people is under investigation. We have the latest.

The fire district that serves Carbondale is asking voters for a tax increase. The chief says it’s needed to fight increasingly intense fires. Opponents say it costs too much.

Snowmass Village voters have a different tax question. It would pay for improvements to aging infrastructure like leaks and cracks in sewer pipes.

A Mid-Valley non-profit is concerned about the health of the Fryingpan River. Flows were down over the summer… thanks to the drought last winter... and a study will determine how that affected fish.

The Aspen Skiing Company is recognized with an award for commitment to the arts. Aspen Public Radio’s Roger Adams talks to the Ski-Co’s Managing Partners, Jim and Paula Crown.

Finally, an Aspen ski jumper is hoping to make the Olympic team in the Nordic combined. We profile Michael Ward in the latest Road to Sochi segment.

discoveryspringtexas.com

There are all sorts of tax measures on the November ballot. We’ve covered proposals that would affect residents in Basalt and Carbondale. Now we take a look at a measure in Snowmass Village and a few surrounding areas.

From the first week of June to Labor Day, Anderson Ranch Arts Center is full of working artists, children's workshops, firing kilns, busy cafe kitchen staff, artist lectures, and a variety of other events on and off the campus (to touch on a few). Anderson Ranch's campus closes down for the first week of September, but the season doesn't stop there. Three more works of intensive workshops and artists-in-residence keep the autumn busy. Nancy Wilhelms, the Executive Director of Anderson Ranch, sat down to explain what exactly happens when the busy weeks of summer come to a close. 

More information on Anderson Ranch can be found here

Harvey / Meadows Gallery. / 21" x 21" x 3" Ceramic, glaze 2013.

Artist Brad Miller is no stranger to the Anderson Ranch Arts Center. Arriving at the Ranch in 1980, Miller ran the ceramics studio from 1980 - 1984 and then served as the Executive Director from 1984 - 1992. He is back at the Ranch to teach a two-week long ceramics workshops, focused on ceramic forms and glazes. Miller now lives in Los Angeles and works in a variety of mediums, including painting and photography, in addition to his functional and structural ceramic work. More of his work can be found here

A collection of Miller's work is now on display at the Harvey Meadows Gallery in Aspen. 

Rebecca Kruth

With the USA Pro Cycling Challenge upon us, spectators and athletes are both focused on the excitement during the race. Before the race starts today (Mon., 8-19-13), we take a look at what it's like to be in the middle of the peloton, and what it takes to be a pro rider. Aspen Public Radio’s Rebecca Kruth has more.  

The USA Pro Challenge. If you’re not familiar with the finer points of bike racing, the whole thing can look like a big mess.

Elise Thatcher

The USA Pro Challenge kicks off in Aspen and Snowmass Village today. More than a hundred and fifty top cyclists will compete in the third edition of the race. Many explored the Roaring Fork Valley on two wheels this weekend... and all of them were within arm’s reach during Saturday’s opening ceremonies.

<<Robin Thicke, “Blurred Lines”>>

Elise Thatcher

In a week, more than a hundred residents of the Roaring Fork Valley will be standing at the ready for the USA Pro Challenge. Volunteers will be course officials, media helpers, and help with other logistics to help the cycling race go smoothly. It’s all been done before in previous editions of the race--but this year, volunteers for Aspen and Snowmass Village are prepared to spot terrorists. 

“Anyone can be a victim of terrorism, anytime, anywhere.”

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