Spotlight Health

Carolyn Sackariason/Aspen Public Radio News

Caitlyn Jenner, perhaps the world’s most famous trans-woman, closed Aspen Ideas Festival’s Spotlight Health yesterday. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason reports.

The average annual cost of cancer drugs in the US now exceeds $100,000 and the price of more than 200 generic drugs doubled from 2013 to 2014. That puts them far out of reach for countess ailing people, including many with decent insurance.

The first of our live broadcasts for the Aspen Ideas Festival took place Thursday, June 23. It was titled "The Future of Medicine."

Aspen Institute

 There will be heavy security at the Aspen Ideas Festival and around town with the arrival of the vice president, secretary of state, attorney general, other cabinet members and world leaders.

 

    

In the last episode of our spring series on critical health issues, host Elise Thatcher

talked with neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt about the short and long term effects of going on a diet.

  In the fifth episode of our spring series on critical health issues, host Elise Thatcher talks with a doctor about his experiences being a black medical student and physician. We also delve into the world of using art when treating military service members.

In the fourth episode of our spring series on critical health issues, host Elise Thatcher talks with two guests about the value of truly being yourself, even when it’s challenging or dangerous.

  In the third episode of our our spring series on critical health issues, host Elise Thatcher talks with guest BJ Miller about managing pain, and how we can change the experience of dying. Miller is senior director and advocate at the Zen Hospice Project.

  In the second episode of our our spring series on critical health issues, host Elise Thatcher talks with nutrition researcher and cardiologist Dariush Mozaffarian about how calories from different kinds of foods can affect us in different ways.

Spotlight Health 2016, Episode 1

May 3, 2016

  This is the first episode in our spring series on critical health issues. In this program we’ll talk with researcher Vic Strecher about the boost you could get if you have a specific purpose in life. One example? People with a purpose are “2.4 times less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease 7 years later,” according to Strecher.

Featured Speakers: Francis Collins, Judy Woodruff

Precision medicine is the opposite of one-size-fits-all therapy. An emerging approach to preventing or treating diseases, it factors in individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle in order to custom-tailor treatment. 

Featured Speakers: Seema Yasmin, Chris Underhill// Sometimes the mind seems to have been left behind. Despite tremendous progress in other branches of medicine, mental health services fail millions who need them, the pharmaceutical armamentarium is inadequate, stigma remains a tremendous impediment to care, and the power of early intervention has not been adequately harnessed. 

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the final episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear about something called Doctor in a Box.

“It’s telemedicine that you can have in the privacy of your own home, or you can actually take the kit with you while you’re traveling and have consistent access to health care.”

The idea comes from a firm who also came up with a bike you probably saw on facebook or twitter last year. Yes, we’ll hear where the Denny Bike is now.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fifth episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today, we sit down with a recently retired FDA commissioner.

As part of her tenure, Dr. Margaret Hamburg focused on how the U.S. can make sure food and medicine coming from other countries is safe.

Later in the program we’ll hear the argument in favor of hospital mergers and some of the results from one in New York City.

That’s coming up, here on Spotlight Health.

FDA.gov

Dr. Margaret Hamburg is catching her breath, after finishing up six years as head of the US Food and Drug Administration, or FDA. The agency is one of the most influential in Americans' everyday lives, regulating products that account for twenty cents of every dollar consumers spend. As Commissioner, Hamburg faced tremendous challenges, and spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about her time there.

feministing.com

Good afternoon you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the fourth episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we’ll hear from a health expert who noticed patients spend a lot of time in hospitals without much to do and how that changes when there is art and music in the building.

“I witnessed moments where patients would listen to the concert, and that could be the last beautiful thing they’ve heard.”

NEWSWIRE.FM

Doctor Iva Fattorini started her career as a dermatologist. After a stint in the world of e-medicine, or telemedicine, she’s now focusing on art and music in hospitals. Fattorini is founder of if the company Artocene.She’s also Chair of the Cleveland Clinic's Global Arts & Medicine Institute. In the United States, the medical center has an extensive art collection, and art and music therapy. The Cleveland Clinic recently opened a new center in Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates. Fattorini is charged with implementing arts and music at the new location. She spoke by Skype with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health on Aspen Public Radio. This is the third episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today we hear from the doctor who keeps an eye on infectious diseases for the National Institutes of Health. With the measles outbreak in December, he’s tackling the vaccine controversy head on by getting the word out to parents who have not already vaccinated their kids.

“I would try and convince them by, first of all, not attacking them.”

poz.com

Vaccines have gotten a lot more attention in the last few months. Officials, parents, and others are grappling with a measles outbreak that started in Disneyland, in late December. Doctor Anthony Fauci is Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. That’s at the National Institutes of Health. Fauci spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher. He says there could be more measles outbreaks, because there are so many unvaccinated people in the United States.

feministing.com

Good afternoon, you’re listening to Spotlight Health, on Aspen Public Radio.

This is the second episode in our series on critical health issues.

Today, we’ll find out what living longer can mean both emotionally and logistically.

“I ask people on a regular basis, if you have an extra 30 years, where would you put them. And no one has ever said, ‘I’d want to make old age longer.’ ”

We’ll also hear about one way of becoming younger by using blood. That’s right, blood.

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