State

Colorado state news and state government coverage. 

Democratic state lawmakers say a new law requiring universal background checks for gun purchases is working well. Data from the Department of Public Safety shows 2 percent of private gun sales were blocked because of the law.

Colorado’s energy industry trade group is now involved on three fronts with lawsuits over voter approved fracking bans or moratoriums. The latest move involved the announcement of suits against Lafayette and Fort Collins.  

Indian Law and Order Commission

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is often associated with veterans, and hundreds of thousands of Iraq and Afghanistan combat vets have been diagnosed. But another group of people in the US with an even higher rate of PTSD… and they have never been to a foreign war zone. That’s according to out November 2013 by a presidential commission.

Colorado’s Energy industry is continuing to make the case that hydraulic fracturing is safe and a critical part of the state’s economy.

Colorado's Independent Ethics Commission is moving forward to review an ethics complaint against Governor John Hickenlooper. The Governor’s office blasted the claim saying it has no merit.

Theater projectors are going where most of the dazzling special effects in summer blockbusters have gone: All digital. In 2014, Hollywood will no longer release movies on traditional film stock. Theaters must convert or be forced to close – including those in rural Colorado.

Calling them ‘groundbreaking,’ Governor John Hickenlooper proposed new statewide air quality rules for oil and gas drilling Monday. The rules aim to reduce air pollution from methane emissions.

Colorado voters gave a mixed reaction Tuesday on a pair of statewide tax increases. Voters didn’t want to tax themselves to pay for education, but were overwhelmingly willing to tax recreational marijuana to help rebuild schools.

About ten percent of Colorado’s registered voters have already cast ballots for the Nov. 5 election. So far Republicans have turned out in higher numbers.

Governor John Hickenlooper announced the appointment of William Hood to the bench Friday afternoon. Hood is filling the place of retiring chief justice John Bender.

A bipartisan committee of 12 Colorado lawmakers will soon meet to examine the state’s response to September’s devastating Front Range floods.

Colorado is preparing for the state’s first recreational marijuana stores to open this January. In the meantime, voters still have the final say on how the new product will be taxed through Proposition AA.

A ballot question to raise Colorado income taxes to help improve public schools has survived a legal challenge. A Denver District Court Judge has ruled that the proposal can go before voters.

State Law Meant to Ease Process for Voters in November

Oct 15, 2013
Creative Commons/Flickr/Muffet

Ballots for the November election are being mailed to voters across the state on Tuesday. Some county clerks say this election will be more convenient for voters than past elections, thanks to a new state law. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

With just over three weeks until the election, the campaign asking Colorado voters to approve a $1 billion tax increase to pay for improvements to public schools are planning what they call a robust door-to-door operation.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Alan Cleaver

A set of new reports show Amendment 66 will be a drag on Colorado’s economy unless there’s substantial improvement in students’ performance.

Piles of wooden debris laced with flip flops, prescription pill bottles and Styrofoam cluttered Highway 34 near the mouth of the Big Thompson Canyon. The scene is hidden behind Army National Guard barricades, and was shown to the media for the first time Tuesday night.

As the remaining flood survivors continue to be airlifted out of towns cut off by flooding, the focus is beginning to shift to recovery. Specifically on the very reason they have to be airlifted: roads.

After rain pummeled flooded communities over the weekend, long awaited sunshine poked through the clouds Monday. Towns are just starting to dry out from days of heavy rain and flooding.

The flooding that has roared through communities and canyons across Colorado's Front Range in recent days is now being blamed for:

-- as many as eight deaths

-- damaging or destroying 19,000 homes

-- causing up to $500 million worth of damage to roads and highways.

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