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State

Colorado state news and state government coverage from our correspondents on the Front Range. 

A proposal that would pave the way for driverless cars in Colorado cleared the House Tuesday with widespread support. Supporters said it will help Colorado prepare for new technology and automation.

Neighborly disputes are nothing new. There’s the dog next door that poops on your lawn. The house that throws loud backyard parties. The guy down the block who always plows through the stop sign.

But in Colorado, the introduction of legal, home-grown marijuana has elevated tension among neighbors to a whole new level.

Because of gaps in the state constitutional amendments that legalized cultivation of the drug for recreational and medical purposes -- and in the ensuing rules that sought to regulate it further -- some rural pockets in Colorado are seeing large-scale cooperative marijuana grow operations sprout up with little oversight.

The $28.6 billion state budget is making its way through the legislature. It covers everything from roads and health care to schools and prisons. Despite many lawmakers wanting significant changes, it overwhelmingly cleared the Senate.

Statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland discussed the politics behind the budget with reporters John Frank with The Denver Post and Nic Garcia with ChalkBeat.

Lawmakers have reached the point in their annual 120-day session where they take up the budget. It grew by roughly 4 percent compared to last year - but it still doesn’t keep up with state expenses. 

A proposal to get more money for Colorado’s aging and congested transportation system is on its legislative journey. The bipartisan bill, a top priority for legislative leaders and the governor, would send the question of a sales tax increase to voters and allow the state to borrow $3.5 billion for roads and infrastructure. The first committee hearing lasted about seven hours.  

New oil and gas drilling operations would have to be built further away from schools than they are now. That's according to a bill that advanced in the House on Wednesday. Democrats backed it after a seven-hour hearing in a packed room at the Capitol.

Self-driving vehicles could soon be tested in Colorado under a bill that passed in the state senate Wednesday. The measure would also make it illegal for local communities to ban the vehicles. 

A measure that would provide additional mental health training and support for police officers is moving through the state legislature.

State lawmakers want to curb the suspension rate among young children in pre-school through third grade. A bi-partisan measure to address the issue is making its way through the state house.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Pictures of Money

The latest economic forecast shows state lawmakers will need to close a budget gap that’s close to $700 million this session.

Colorado’s latest revenue forecast shows that state lawmakers will have to fill a larger budget gap than anticipated -- a $696 million gap. Bente Birkeland spoke with other statehouse reporters about what this could mean for the state budget.

There are plenty of things that lead to distracted driving along Colorado’s roadways: eating, putting on makeup or changing the station on your radio. Texting and driving is one distraction state lawmakers want to crack down on. 

Lawmakers are midway through this year’s legislative session and the big issue at the halfway mark is what to do about funding transportation. Democratic and Republican leaders are backing the idea of asking voters this fall if they support a tax increase to address those needs. The issue is poised to dominate the second half of the session.

“If there is going to be a long-term solution to transportation infrastructure it’s going to almost certainly require something that the voters are going to weigh in on,” said Senate President Kevin Grantham, a Republican. He made that comment late last year, prior to the January start of the session, and has kept the promise, backing House Bill 1142, which would add millions of dollars for transportation needs.

A Republican proposal to change how the Taxpayers Bill of Rights (TABOR) is calculated to let Colorado keep more of the tax money it currently collects received initial approval in the House Tuesday. More Democrats back the bill than Republicans.

State lawmakers are leading an effort to change how the Taxpayers Bill of Rights (TABOR) is calculated. The goal: Let Colorado keep more of the tax money it collects.

Advocates say Senate Bill 40 does something simple: It brings the Colorado Open Records Act into the 21st century by requiring state agencies to provide information in a digital format -- such as a database or a spreadsheet -- where feasible.

“These are the people’s records. We are the custodians, we are the stewards of these records,” said Democratic Sen. John Kefalas of Fort Collins. He’s the main sponsor of the bill.

For some, the issue is more complicated.

More than 400 bills have so far been introduced during Colorado’s annual legislative session. Many of the bills that are controversial are short-lived, even if the debates last for hours. 

JOHN SUTHERS STATE OF THE CITY 2016 / COLORADO SPRINGS

A proposal to study whether passenger rail is viable along the Front Range cleared the State Senate on Thursday. It now heads to the House. 

Recreational marijuana clubs, also called social lounges, are allowed in some Colorado communities, but state law is murky on whether or not their existence is legal and how they should be regulated. Two proposals currently moving through the legislature aim to add clarity by requiring either voters or local governments to approve the clubs.

Statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland sat down with Kristen Wyatt with the Associated Press and Luke Perkins with the Durango Herald to discuss the details.

Republican state Sen. Ray Scott could help define one of the most often used phrases of 2017: fake news. 

The battle centers around an opinion column published in the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel about Senate Bill 40, a bill to increase access to public records. The column implies that a scheduled hearing was postponed because Scott -- who serves as assistant majority leader -- didn’t support it. 

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