suicide

Elise Thatcher

A suicide prevention organization is unveiling a new campaign tonight. The Hope Center, now based in Basalt, is also hosting an expert on healing communities.  Michelle Muething is Executive Director of the small nonprofit, which offers a hotline and counseling for people with suicidal thoughts. Muething says the new effort is called the "Erase the Stigma" campaign, and it’s based on feedback gathered since last spring.

Marci Krivonen

About 200 people recognized veterans on Tuesday during a ceremony near the courthouse in Aspen. A list of names of Aspen veterans who have died was read as part of the observance. 

The on-looking crowd stretched out from the Veteran’s Memorial Site to Main Street as friends and family members shared words about their vets. Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron said a debt is owed to those who protect our freedom.

Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners

Mental illness is a major issue in the Roaring Fork Valley, and around Colorado. As part of his administration’s plan to help more people get help for untreated illness, Governor John Hickenlooper announced a new statewide mental health hotline last month. Bev Marquez is the CEO of Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners, the organization running that new hotline. Marquez talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about the response so far—and whether residents in the Roaring Fork Valley should call the statewide hotline or a local hotline first.

    

Creative Commons/Flickr/Lloyd Morgan

A suicide prevention group is holding a training for the public on Monday on how to recognize if loved ones are exhibiting suicidal signs. The Aspen-based Hope Center has already trained 3000 people in the Roaring Fork Valley but, now they’re using a different method. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to Michelle Muething, director of the Hope Center and Dr. Kelly Posner-Gerstenhaber, creator of the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale.

Christina King

Mental health experts, law enforcement, and many others in the Roaring Fork Valley have been tackling the issue of suicide. Deaths by suicide in the area are some of the highest in the state… and after a particularly tough beginning to 2015, providers and advocates have been working to increase prevention. One new element is the Aspen Strong Foundation. It’s led by Executive Director and Founder Christina King, who recently moved to Aspen after visiting for over a decade. King talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher, and says she’s inspired by the amount of mental health resources in the Valley.

Elise Thatcher

Governor John Hickenlooper has signed a new law creating a commission to tackle the issue of suicide in Colorado. Members are to be chosen within the next two months, and will include representatives from mental health, law enforcement, education, and other sectors. The commission comes as providers in the Roaring Fork Valley are also trying to figure out how to keep people from committing suicide. Representatives from the mid Valley met in Carbondale on Wednesday to continue brainstorming and educating the public. 

Creating Community Solutions Colorado

 

 The Roaring Fork Valley is part of a national effort to tackle mental health problems. Locals met with state mental health leaders this weekend to talk about what the key issues are here. The goal is to help figure out the best way to solve them. 

Elise Thatcher

Last night, more than three hundred people gathered to learn about a very difficult subject. Residents from Aspen and the greater Roaring Fork Valley attended the Wheeler Opera House for a community forum on suicide. The event was prompted by a spike in suicides this winter, as well as the ongoing high rate in the Valley. Last night’s forum was hosted by the Aspen Hope Center. 

Elise Thatcher

A string of suicides  has sparked a community meeting on the subject. After three deaths in period of ten days, the Aspen Hope Center held a gathering yesterday on how to better tackle the troubling problem. Counselors, law enforcement, residents, and others met in Basalt.  

 

Valley Roundup - February 7th, 2014

Feb 7, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.

The Aspen Times’ Andy Stone and Aspen Daily News’ Carolyn Sackariason join us this week to discuss:

The death of a friend; Stewart Oksenhorn chose this week to take his own life.

The snow that keeps on coming; the wet heavy kind.

Aspen goes after homeowners who rent out their place and don’t pay any lodging tax.

The TSA goes fast-track at Aspen Airport.

Casa Tua is off the hook for its big-pour to a local drunk.

And on the Download with Rob St. Mary – Tracking the local Sochi connection. Also, robots writing poetry; the horror, the horror.

Its all on this week’s Valley Roundup.

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