suicide

Your Evening News - January 28th, 2015

Jan 28, 2015

CMC Holds Local Associates Level Tuition to Zero Increase

Tuition for locals will be the same at Colorado Mountain College this academic year. The board of trustees approved a zero increase on associate-degree-level courses for those who live in the district. Those who are in-state but out of district will be an extra $6.50 per credit hour at the associates-degree level while residents of Chaffee, Grand and Jackson Counties will pay $6 extra per credit hour. The biggest increase comes for those paying out-of-state tuition, who will see a $56 per credit hour increase. A news release from CMC says the school remains one of the most affordable in the state. At the same time, the board of trustees are expected to work over the next few months on comprehensive and strategic plans to improve student access and achievement through changes to the school’s financial aid programs.

Your Morning News - January 28th, 2015

Jan 28, 2015

Glenwood Hot Springs Responds to Bacteria Complaint

The Glenwood Hot Springs says it is keeping up with making sure one of its pools is safe to use. The business told Aspen Public Radio last night that routine maintenance already does a good job preventing too much of a certain kind of bacteria.

Last summer, the therapy pool at the Hot Springs tested positive for a bacteria that can cause what’s called hot tub rash. It is dangerous only for people with weaker immune systems like cancer patients. John Bosco is Chief Operations Officer with the business.

“The levels shown in the test results are, it’s arguable, whether it’s a level that’s deemed very dangerous or whether it’s not. The state does not currently have any requirements for testing and monitoring.”

Garfield County officials agree that the Glenwood Hot Springs Pool and Lodge has measures in place to keep the water clean. Josh Williams is Environmental Health Manager.

“I mean their monitoring and tracking of that is above and beyond the required testing is for bacterial contamination. Which is a good indicator that they take it very seriously.”

Garfield County says the bacteria are naturally occurring, though also the leading cause of hospital infections. The possibility of high levels at the Glenwood Hot Springs recently came to light after a local resident publicly complained this week saying government officials aren’t doing enough to prevent the bacteria from being dangerous. She had originally complained last year of ongoing severe intestinal sickness.

Elise Thatcher

A suicide prevention organization is unveiling a new campaign tonight. The Hope Center, now based in Basalt, is also hosting an expert on healing communities.  Michelle Muething is Executive Director of the small nonprofit, which offers a hotline and counseling for people with suicidal thoughts. Muething says the new effort is called the "Erase the Stigma" campaign, and it’s based on feedback gathered since last spring.

Marci Krivonen

About 200 people recognized veterans on Tuesday during a ceremony near the courthouse in Aspen. A list of names of Aspen veterans who have died was read as part of the observance. 

The on-looking crowd stretched out from the Veteran’s Memorial Site to Main Street as friends and family members shared words about their vets. Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron said a debt is owed to those who protect our freedom.

Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners

Mental illness is a major issue in the Roaring Fork Valley, and around Colorado. As part of his administration’s plan to help more people get help for untreated illness, Governor John Hickenlooper announced a new statewide mental health hotline last month. Bev Marquez is the CEO of Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners, the organization running that new hotline. Marquez talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about the response so far—and whether residents in the Roaring Fork Valley should call the statewide hotline or a local hotline first.

    

Creative Commons/Flickr/Lloyd Morgan

A suicide prevention group is holding a training for the public on Monday on how to recognize if loved ones are exhibiting suicidal signs. The Aspen-based Hope Center has already trained 3000 people in the Roaring Fork Valley but, now they’re using a different method. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to Michelle Muething, director of the Hope Center and Dr. Kelly Posner-Gerstenhaber, creator of the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale.

Christina King

Mental health experts, law enforcement, and many others in the Roaring Fork Valley have been tackling the issue of suicide. Deaths by suicide in the area are some of the highest in the state… and after a particularly tough beginning to 2015, providers and advocates have been working to increase prevention. One new element is the Aspen Strong Foundation. It’s led by Executive Director and Founder Christina King, who recently moved to Aspen after visiting for over a decade. King talks with APR’s Elise Thatcher, and says she’s inspired by the amount of mental health resources in the Valley.

Elise Thatcher

Governor John Hickenlooper has signed a new law creating a commission to tackle the issue of suicide in Colorado. Members are to be chosen within the next two months, and will include representatives from mental health, law enforcement, education, and other sectors. The commission comes as providers in the Roaring Fork Valley are also trying to figure out how to keep people from committing suicide. Representatives from the mid Valley met in Carbondale on Wednesday to continue brainstorming and educating the public. 

Creating Community Solutions Colorado

 

 The Roaring Fork Valley is part of a national effort to tackle mental health problems. Locals met with state mental health leaders this weekend to talk about what the key issues are here. The goal is to help figure out the best way to solve them. 

Elise Thatcher

Last night, more than three hundred people gathered to learn about a very difficult subject. Residents from Aspen and the greater Roaring Fork Valley attended the Wheeler Opera House for a community forum on suicide. The event was prompted by a spike in suicides this winter, as well as the ongoing high rate in the Valley. Last night’s forum was hosted by the Aspen Hope Center. 

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