Valley Health Alliance

Elise Thatcher

A supervisor can have a bigger impact on a worker’s health than a primary care doctor. That’s according to the The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The federal office recently sent experts to Aspen to teach managers how to handle that power wisely.

Elise Thatcher

  Mountain Family joins four of the biggest employers in the Aspen area, which created the Valley Health Alliance to help workers get healthier and save money for employees and employers.

Elise Thatcher

  The Valley Health Alliance is reviewing new information showing the top three medical problems workers are dealing with. A recent report looks at health fair data from workers with the City of Aspen, Pitkin County, Aspen Valley Hospital, and the Aspen School District.

Tracy Olson/Flickr

  Pitkin County has been spending millions of dollars on medical care for its workers. That’s dropped dramatically in recent years. Pitkin County is projected to spend more than $3.6 million in the 2015 calendar year, a significant drop from previous years.

www.boilermakers.org

  The Valley Health Alliance will be hearing from a national expert on worker health and safety on Thursday, October 15th. Researcher Doctor Casey Chosewood is with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which is part of the Centers for Disease Control.

A significant chunk of workers in Aspen have high blood pressure.That’s according to data from health fairs last fall, coordinated by the five biggest employers in the Upper Roaring Fork Valley. They’re part of the Valley Health Alliance, a new nonprofit aimed at improving health in the Upper Valley.

Five employers efforts to improve health care and lower insurance costs is shifting into high gear. The group, known as the Valley Health Alliance, has a new Director and was part of a forum yesterday. Details on what the Alliance may try in the next year were discussed-- and mental health will be at the top of the list.