Wayne Williams

November election ballots are being mailed to voters across Colorado this week. There’s no statewide ballot question this year.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

 

Joining me this week are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News. I’m Carolyn Sackariason and you are listening to Valley Roundup, an analysis and commentary of the week’s news with writers and editors. We continue our conversation with Jason Auslander, reporter for the Aspen Times, Randy Essex, editor and publisher of the Glenwood Springs Post Independent and Lorenzo Semple, columnist for the Aspen Daily News.

 

 

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  As of July 31, more than 5,000 Coloradans are no longer registered to vote. They self-selected to unenroll prior to their information being sent to the Trump administration’s election integrity commission.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams announced last week that he will be turning over all public voting records to the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity.

Several hundred people descended on Colorado’s state capitol on Monday to protest the Electoral College process and watch the state’s nine electors’ vote. One elector was replaced after he failed to vote for Hillary Clinton. He could face up to one year in jail or a $1,000 fine.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams says the state’s voting system is secure. This comes after Donald Trump expressed concerns about the mail ballot process over the weekend.

courtesy Pitkin County Clerk

Pitkin County will be among a couple dozen Colorado counties adopting new state-mandated voting machines for the 2016 elections.

Marci Krivonen

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams was in Aspen Tuesday (12/15). He spoke to the Pitkin County Commissioners about a new voting system meant to make elections smoother. 

The Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder’s office is using voting equipment that’s 15 years old. A new system would count ballots faster and cut costs.

By the end of the month Williams will choose a new voting system that all 64 counties will eventually use. He says new technology will mean improved transparency when questions arise about election results.