Winter Olympics

Seatbelts could have prevented some major injuries in a bus rollover that happened in October. That’s when A RFTA bus crashed near Carbondale.

The Pitkin County Jail is working on a set of policies for sexual assault. It’ll serve as a model for rural jails across Colorado.

Turns out, the higher you go in elevation...the bigger your brain gets. This brain swelling may be keeping high school athletes safer.

One of the largest citizen science efforts in the world kicks off on Sunday. The annual Christmas bird count includes volunteers in the Roaring Fork Valley.

And, Aspen’s Olympic history stretches way back. It begins when the first ski runs were being cut on Aspen Mountain...in the 1930’s. We’ll have more in the Road to Sochi.

Stars on Aspen Ice with the Revolution Skating Club, featuring Olympian and Aspenite Jeremy Abbott, along with Peggy Behr of the Revolution Skating Club.

Tickets and more information: click here.

Federal agents on the Front Range today are raiding medical marijuana dispensaries and grow operations with the help of local authorities. We’ll have the latest.

A new method for handling criminals is ramping up in Pitkin County. Instead of incarceration, a new wellness program is being tried for people who fit the bill.

As the Greater Sage Grouse’s habitat disappears across the West, federal officials are deciding how strongly to protect some of its Colorado habitat. Local stakeholders are watching closely.

College students around the country are getting an inside glimpse into the social workings of the Roaring Fork Valley...through a book called “The Slums of Aspen.”

A Wall Street Journal reporter explores the early movers and shakers in developing fracking - one of them is a former Aspen resident.

Finally, the fastest distance Nordic skier in the U-S grew up in Aspen. We profile Noah Hoffman in the Road to Sochi series.

Energy planners gathered in Carbondale this week to compare notes and strategize about funding.

The Town of Basalt approves a home for senior citizens. Now, there’s an effort underway to recruit residents.

Snowmass Village takes a stab at cutting greenhouse gas emissions. The town has some of the highest per capita in the nation.

An independent study finds the Roaring Fork Valley’s mass transit system means big savings for residents.

We find out whether Lance Armstrong had anything to do with death threats against the national agency to prevent doping.

We’ll wrap up with the latest from our Road to Sochi series. Olympic hopeful Meg Olenick aims to be one of the first compete in a sport new to the winter games.

On Tuesday, most voters said “no” to big tax increases locally and statewide. A CSU political science professor says anti-tax activists are growing in their influence.

One measure that did pass taxes retail marijuana to raise money for schools. As pot becomes more available in the state, one youth non-profit is worried.

A warming climate is changing ecosystems in the Roaring Fork Valley and one local government is using open spaces to gather data on what’s happening.

A new art display at the Wyly Art Center in Basalt features the work of a self-taught painter.  Despite being silenced by Alzheimer’s, Winifred Wyman is speaking through paint.

Also today on the Road to Sochi, Aspen native Simi Hamilton works to make the 2014 winter Olympic team. The Nordic ski racer specializes in sprinting.

That’s coming up on Mountain Edition.

allisports.com

Our Road to Sochi series takes a look at the Aspen-area athletes training and competing this fall in hopes of making the 2014 Olympic team. Today, we take you to an extreme snowsports course, one with rails and big jumps. It’s new to the Olympics, but competing in Snowboard Slopestyle is something Jordie Karlinski has been doing for years. The petite 24-year-old is hoping this year, she’ll be throwing tricks in Sochi, Russia. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The government shutdown trudges on but Pitkin County is working to alleviate the pain by increasing access to a local attraction on federal land.

A proposal for funding public education has been called historic by Colorado’s governor. But, the ballot measure could stretch wallets.

The Aspen Skiing Company hopes to catch the eye of up and coming skiers from certain Asian countries.

And, changes may be in store if the USA Pro Challenge bike race returns to the upper Roaring Fork Valley next year. We talk with an economist who says big sporting events may not mean more money for the towns hosting them.

Finally, we get an update on local athletes training for the upcoming Winter Olympics in Russia.

It’s been a big news week and one story with big impacts locally is the federal government shutdown. We take a look at what it means for the Roaring Fork Valley.

Obamacare hit the internet on Tuesday, turns out, health care plans coordinated by Colorado are way more expensive in mountain towns.

After massive floods walloped oil and gas operations, we hear ideas about making sure oil and gas operations are better protected down the road.

Local officials had to decide by Tuesday whether to take steps to allow retail marijuana in the Roaring Fork Valley. Many have decided to delay their verdict.

We get an update from one of the ten Aspen-area athletes hoping to compete in the upcoming Winter Olympics in Russia.

And finally, tamales are a humble Latin American dish with deep, historical roots. They’re the main fare at an upcoming Roaring Fork Valley event.

Oliver Kraus/USSA

Our series continues this week with a look at how winter athletes are chosen for the U.S. Olympic team. The competition is fierce. Athletes who train together often become competitors. There’s a set of guidelines athletes must meet to grab one of a handful of open spots in each event, whether it’s cross-country team sprint, snowboard half-pipe or alpine super-G. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen talked to Tom Kelly with the United States Ski and Snowboard Association, or USSA, about the process.

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