Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the Roaring Fork Valley in the past week. 

A couple that lives in a penthouse in downtown Aspen now has to share the building’s entrance with their neighbors. As a result, their property value decreased $1.3 million, a judge has ruled.

There’s more debate around the live debate that Aspen Public Radio broadcast with city council candidates Bert Myrin and Mick Ireland.

A Grand Ol' Aspen Party

May 22, 2015

Aspen Public Radio is excited to announce our second annual barn dance, A Grand Ol' Aspen Party; an evening filled with BBQ, local brews, dancing, and live music. Join the APR staff and fellow radio lovers on Friday, August 28th at 5:30 pm at the historic Holden/Marolt Barn in Aspen. Ticket price includes a BBQ dinner, first drink, dance lessons, and a night full of live music and dancing - it's sure to be a boot-kickin' good time! So get out those cowboy boots and dust off your hat, this event is for the grand ol' Coloradan in us all!

Figuring out when, or how, to retire can be daunting, and one Snowmass Village resident is hoping to make it a little easier for people her age. Donna Davis is the author of “Retirement Basics, Help for Broke Baby Boomers.” She talks with Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher about the most common issues readers write to her about.

Creative Commons/Medical, Surgical Operative Photography

The V.A. medical center in Grand Junction that cares for patients in the Roaring Fork Valley, is stopping certain surgeries. The move comes after an abnormal number of “unwanted surgical complications.”

Facebook/GrassRoots TV

The two candidates squaring off for a seat on Aspen city council think change needs to happen in the city department that handles development proposals. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more from Thursday night’s “Squirm Night” forum.

The City’s community development department is made up of more than two dozen staffers. It handles construction plans and ensures developments comply with the city’s building code. It also enforces the land use code.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen’s second lifeline to the world is up and running again, as Independence Pass reopens.

A judge dismisses a case against an elderly Carbondale driver who killed a Basalt motorcyclist.

Two Aspen City Council candidates carefully duke it out on the Aspen Public Radio airwaves.

Turns out, you cannot buy exclusive access to your condo building, especially if you share the building with affordable housing residents.

Childcare in the Roaring Fork Valley is getting harder to find.

Pitkin County Library on the move

May 21, 2015
Carolyn Sackariason

The Pitkin County Library is moving to another location next week to make room for its expansion and remodeling project. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyn Sackariason has more.

Elise Thatcher

The rental housing shortage in the mid Roaring Fork Valley is ratcheting up. As Aspen Public Radio has reported, rapidly increasing prices and restrictions are having a significant impact on residents. In our second story in our series, Aspen Public Radio’s Elise Thatcher takes a look at the subsidized housing options in the Mid-Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/TheBoyFromFindlay

The Garfield County Commissioners are working to send a powerful message that they’re against new transmountain diversions. 

The commissioners are organizing a meeting of Western Slope elected leaders to draw up a unified message ahead of the completion of Governor Hickenlooper’s statewide water plan. Garfield County Commissioner Tom Jankovsky:

Creative Commons/Flickr/Oregon Dept. of Transportation

Pitkin county staff will explore using rooftops and other government property to install solar panels. County commissioners this week approved a funding request for a feasibility study. 

The county will spend between $15,000 and $25,000 to locate beneficial sites for solar and find out how much electricity could be generated. Right now, the county consumes 1.3 megawatt hours per year and it’s not offset by any significant renewable efforts. County Engineer G.R. Fielding says now is a good time to pursue solar.

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