News

Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

Pitkin County residents will likely be asked to continue taxing themselves to pay for open space and trails for another twenty years.

The Open Space and Trails Board plans to ask voters in November to extend a mill levy that provides about $10 million of funding a year. Allocation of that money would change slightly to allow for more spending on maintenance and stewardship of current Open Space and Trails properties.

 

   This week on Audio Canvas I meet with Doug Casebeer, Associate Director & Artistic Director of Ceramics, and Betsy Chaffin, honorary board trustee about the 50th anniversary celebration week beginning July 17th.

  

First Draft - Charles Bock

Jul 18, 2016

Charles Bock is the author of the novels Alice & Oliver and Beautiful Children, which was a New York Times bestseller and Notable Book, and which won the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and Slate, as well as in numerous anthologies. He has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Yaddo, UCross, and the Vermont Studio Center.

Amy Gray is a 5th grade teacher at Aspen Middle School. Every month, her class is visited by a special guest, Adelaide Waters, a volunteer storyteller for Spellbinders. Waters has a new story to tell the students every month, and as Gray explains, the students are captured by each and every story. 

Gray shares the importance of oral storytelling for her students and the value the program brings to her classroom. Spellbinders Executive Director, Catherine Scales Johnson also contributes. 

State oil and gas hearings held in Glenwood Springs

Jul 17, 2016
Elise Thatcher

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission will hold hearings in Glenwood Springs on Tuesday, which gives the public a chance to comment on development proposals in Battlement Mesa.

 

The meeting offers a chance for citizens to share their thoughts with the state regulating commission, known as the COGCC, about several proposed well pads in Battlement Mesa.

 

Aspen Public Radio

The Aspen High School is once again looking for an assistant principal.

 

 

Grant Safranek accepted the job in May. But last week, he rescinded without giving a reason.

Principal Tharyn Mulberry said it was not an acrimonious departure. The job opening was posted internally and as of Friday, four candidates had applied. They happen to be the same ones who applied for the job this past spring when Safranek was picked.

Whoever fills the position will be on one-year trial basis.

Ken Krehbiel via Facebook

Bear activity closed campgrounds, a moose charged a woman and her dog, and three mountain lion kittens were spotted along the Rio Grande trail — all in one day earlier this summer. Perry Will, area wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), said days like this are becoming the new norm.

Madeleine Osberger/Aspen Daily News

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

The Aspen affordable housing program is in a mid-life crisis of sorts. How to manage nearly 3,000 subsidized units is weighing on public officials.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Barbara Platts present a compilation of the week’s news.

This Week on Audio Canvas I meet with Tom Sachs  internationally acclaimed contemporary artist. 

Madeleine Osberger/Aspen Daily News

  The unveiling of what’s now being called the “Basalt River Park” by a citizen’s committee earlier this week has turned some heads and raised some eyebrows. At $8 million dollars, elected officials and fiscal conservatives are wondering whether it’s worth it. Joining news director Carolyn Sackariason on Valley Roundup are Madeleine Osberger, contributing editor of the Aspen Daily News and Andy Stone, columnist for the Aspen Times.

Courtesy Photo

Lynn Goldsmith’s “The Looking Glass” exhibit continues at the Art Base in Basalt. The show features wildly distorted self-portraits, in which Goldsmith contorts her body. Some photos look pastoral — others are straight out of a Tim Burton Film.

Art nonprofits up and down the valley are handling interns in different ways. The Aspen Art Museum typically tries to work with locals who might be staying with family or who are home from college for the summer.

Last day for public input on biodiversity policy

Jul 14, 2016
Courtesy of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails

The public comment period for Open Space and Trails’ new biodiversity policy closes today after two extensions.

 

The draft policy sets biodiversity - not recreation - as the top priority in making decisions about Open Space and Trails’ properties.

Aspen Pitkin County Jail held an open house yesterday to showcase the facility’s latest renovations. Signs were hung around the jail for visitors to help give them an idea of what each room was. There was the nurse’s office, inmate’s cells, day rooms, gym and even a pat search area in the entry garage.

 

Courtesy photo

Jonathan Moore is a three-time Aspen Music Festival and School student. The 23-year-old viola player plays his instrument in one of the new practice facilities at the Bucksbaum Campus up Castle Creek.

Courtesy of White River National Forest

Campers in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness will need to store all food and garbage in bear-resistant containers for the next five years.

 Puccini's La Boheme is the tragic story of bohemian artists and lovers in  turn-of-the-century Paris, robed in some of the most beautiful music ever written. At times funny, tragic and heart-opening but always melodious, no opera has caught the affection and devotion of opera lovers as universally as Puccini's La Boheme

McCloskey Speaker Series: Steve Case

Jul 12, 2016

The McCloskey Speaker Series continued on Tuesday with Steve Case, the co-founder of America Online. He spoke with Walter Isaacson, the president and CEO of the Aspen Institute. Case spoke to Isaacson about his latest book, "The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur's Vision of the Future".  It examines some of the most important business decisions in the age of the internet. Listen to their full conversation, below.

Traffic counters parked for local projects

Jul 12, 2016
Aspen Public Radio News

Two traffic counts for separate government projects have been measuring activity in and out of Aspen at peak drive times to gather data for local management plans.

Troy Tyler sits in the back of his pickup at the intersection at 8th and Smuggler in the West End, watching the long line of cars and trucks headed out of town. He pushes a button on handheld machine indicating the behavior of each car, biker, or pedestrian, and he does this hundreds of times over two hours.

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