News

 A bill to create a public lands day in Colorado is now headed to the Governor’s desk. The measure generated controversy at the legislature but lawmakers ultimately worked on a compromise. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

To hear the full story, click here.

The MARBLE/Marble Symposium is a series of three week long sessions where sculptors of all ages and abilities come to the town of Marble to carve. Founder Madeline Weiner and Sculptor Dawn Record discuss the symposium, participants, and power of carving marble stone. 

Registration is now open for summer symposiums and tours are available for visitors. More information at www.MarbleInst.org

City of Aspen

  Pitkin County is asking for over 21,000 square feet of new development along with renovation of the Courthouse Plaza building.

Elise Thatcher

Water managers have formally decided to allow another release from Ruedi Reservoir in the coming months.

 Welcome to Valley Roundup.

This week on Cross Currents is from the archives with NPR Foreign Correspondent Mike Shuster from the Given Institute on Iran, China, North Korea, and Syria. 

Sunil Yapa will be the first resident. He will arrive in May. Yapa’s debut novel “Your Heart is a Muscle the Size of A Fist” has received high acclaim. The Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune and Buzzfeed all listed it as one of their most anticipated books of the year.

 

 A trio of measures aimed at making it easier for more Coloradans to rent and buy homes cleared its first committee at the state capitol on Thursday. But as Bente Birkeland reports, time is running out for the bills to pass before the legislature adjourns next week.

For the full story, click here

Andrea Booher is a photojournalist who calls Aspen her home. Fifteen years ago she saw first hand the effects of the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center. The pictures she took there will be on display at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. Booher spoke with Aspen Public Radio arts reporter about her experiences at Ground Zero…

  On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Elise Thatcher present a compilation of the week’s news.

courtesy Colorado Department of Transportation

 Fatal accidents are down in both Pitkin and Garfield counties, according to the five-year data released by CDOT. However, the Roaring Fork Valley sees more average yearly fatalities per capita than Colorado as a whole.

Flikr user Jim Leach

  Health insurance is especially pricey in the Roaring Fork Valley. Now Gov. John Hickenlooper is expected to approve a study looking at making the cost of insurance more equitable across the state.

Andrea Booher’s first observation when she got to Ground Zero was how dark it was.

 

“They didn’t have any lighting set up and it was like we were looking into this abyss,” said Booher.

The permanent rockfall mitigation project in Glenwood Canyon will cause 30-minute delays for traffic in both directions May 10, 11 and 12, according to the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT).

This project, which is classified as an emergency, comes after the February rock slide when the canyon was closed for several days. CDOT anticipates finishing the project by Sept. 1.

Two local leaders have joined a national push for increased methane regulation in the oil and gas industry.

A letter sent to President Barack Obama and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator  Gina McCarthy last week has the support of 70 elected officials nationwide, including outgoing Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot and Aspen Mayor Steve Skadron.

Carbondale is getting a little more creative this week. The town’s application to become a certified creative district is in the hands of Colorado Creative Industries, the state organization in charge of the program.

Marci Krivonen

Oil and gas organizers hope to put two oil and gas-related questions on the fall ballot. A handful of local activists are part of the effort, which is receiving more attention after a recent state supreme court decision.

 

The popular trail that leads to Hanging Lake in the Glenwood Canyon will be closed one or two days in May, June and September while the Eagle-Holy Cross Ranger District does maintenance aimed at protecting habitats along the trail. The dates the trail will be closed are May 25-26, June 13-14 and Sept. 10

 

Maintenance for the trail includes moving large rocks, painting bridges, removing graffiti, adding new rock steps and creating a barrier system for protecting habitats.

Dr. Mindy Nagle and ER physician Greg Balko won seats on the Aspen Valley Hospital Board of Directors yesterday.

Leticia Ingram

Leticia Ingram is having a huge week. The Basalt teacher was honored by President Barack Obama on Tuesday, with other celebrated teachers from across the country.

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