News

Elise Thatcher

    

The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) announced Thursday that Basalt’s underpass will receive funding from the department’s Safe Routes to School Program. Only seven projects were approved for funding out of 21 communities who applied.

Basalt will receive $264,500, which will go towards the pedestrian underpass at the intersection of Highway 82 and Basalt Avenue. Leslie Feuerborn, who manages CDOT’s Safe Routes to School Program, said the goal is to get more kids to walk or bike to school.  

  Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Colorado Mountain College is holding off on a plan to raise prices for ESL and GED classes.

It’s an especially tough time of year for homeless folks in the upper valley.

Five Point is back in Carbondale this weekend, with a lot more films by women.

Elise Thatcher

  Taking a GED or ESL class at Colorado Mountain College costs about $40 right now. Starting this summer, school officials were planning on charging twice as much, but now that price increase is on hold until the fall.

Jutulen/Wikipedia

  This week the American Lung Association, or ALA, released its review of air quality around the country. The national organization says Glenwood Springs has dangerously high levels of pollution.

 On Cross Currents this week, a rebroadcast of a conversation with attorney Anita Hill.

Roger Adams / Aspen Public Radio

The snowstorms during these final days of skiing are a welcome return to winter for some. But, unlike the winter months, the Aspen Homeless Shelter is no longer open. For those without a home this is the hardest time of year.

Aspen Community School Adopts New Safety Measures

Apr 20, 2016
Marci Krivonen

The Aspen Community School is implementing a new safety plan that includes drills like “lockdowns” and table-top exercises. The increased security is meant to prepare for events like an active shooter, a bear inside the school or a wildfire. As contributor Marci Krivonen reports, schools across Colorado have been increasing security since Columbine in 1999.

Barbara Platts/Aspen Public Radio

Aspen city government is watching to ensure that whatever goes in the former Little Annie’s space keeps its prices reasonable. Carolyn Sackariason reports.

City officials have built on their experience negotiating with business interests in the past. The deed restriction on the Little Annie’s building is more restrictive than other ones in town.

facebook.com/KidsFirstAspen

The data from a Kids First survey regarding early childcare options was presented to the Aspen City Council last night.

Courtesy/Kim Doyle Wille

 Composting is one tactic for diverting waste from the Pitkin County Landfill which is quickly reaching capacity. A “living lab” has created gardens at the landfill in order to take full advantage of the compost there. This spring there will also be a series of workshops for residents eager to turn their own thumbs green.

The board of education for the Aspen school district wants to get it right when asking the community if naming rights to honor donors ought to become policy. Carolyn Sackariason reports.

School board members discussed yesterday how they should proceed with the idea of naming rights to honor donors in a public way. The proposal was first presented by the school district’s fundraising arm, the Aspen Education Foundation. The nonprofit is about to launch a public capital and endowment campaign.

Dan Wagner/U.S. Forest Service

  The White River National Forest is saying goodbye to agency spokesman Bill Kight. After more than two decades with the Forest Service, Kight is retiring at the end of this month, and heading to the Frontier Historical Society in Glenwood Springs.

Elise Thatcher

A Basalt resident is asking the Colorado Municipal League and a District Attorney to take a close look at the spring election in Basalt. That’s as preparations continue to swear in new town council members and mayor Jacque Whitsitt on Tuesday night.

First Draft - Rob Spillman

Apr 18, 2016

Rob Spillman is editor of Tin House magazine and editorial advisor of Tin House Books. He was previously the monthly book columnist for Details magazine and is a contributor of book reviews and essays to Salon and Bookforum.

Derek Hanrahan is an alumnus of Roaring Fork Leadership and serves on the Roaring Fork Center for Community Leadership's Board of Directors. He talks about his experience in Roaring Fork Leadership and the impact the program has had on his life both professionally and personally. 

The application for the class of 2017 is now available online at www.rfleadership.org

Aspen Skiing Company/Dan Bayer

 

Skiers and snowboarders said goodbye to Aspen Mountain yesterday for the 2015/2016 season.

Elise Thatcher

An overloaded traffic light is one of the biggest hurdles for backers of an El Jebel development proposal, but another traffic-related fee may also prove to be an obstacle.

Welcome to Valley Roundup. I’m Carolyn Sackariason.

The source of the sewage stench wafting up from storm sewers in downtown Aspen has been identified.

Aspen officials zero in on source of foul odors

Aspen’s sewage leak lasted for more than a month

And in Snowmass, voters are being asked to buck up for a new sewage plant.

Aspen Center for Environmental Studies

The 500-acre prescribed burn that took place earlier this month on the slopes above Avalanche Creek Campground and Filoha Meadows was a success, according to Pitkin County Open Space and Trails and the U.S. Forest Service. However, the fire may not be out just yet.

The Garfield County Sheriff is taking aim at District Attorney Sherry Caloia. In emails between the two elected officials, the sheriff calls her incompetent and ignorant. Joining News Director Carolyn Sackariason to discuss the context around that description is Glenwood Post Independent editor Randy Essex.

Pages