Bente Birkeland

Capitol Coverage Reporter for Rocky Mountain Community Radio

Bente Birkeland has covered Colorado politics and government since spring of 2006. She loves the variety and challenge of the state capitol beat and talking to people from all walks of life. Bente's work has aired on NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered, American Public Media'sMarketplace, and she was a contributor for WNYC's The Next Big Thing. She has won numerous local and national awards, including best beat reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors. Bente grew up in Minnesota and England, and loves skiing, hiking, and is an aspiring cello player. She lives in Lakewood with her husband.

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Lawmakers on the joint budget committee have questions about how the state is managing wildlife programs and hunting and fishing permits.

Two members of Colorado’s Electoral College have filed a lawsuit in U.S. district court challenging the electoral college system and the way Colorado binds electors.

Colorado is expected to see modest job growth next year across many industries. The new economic outlook was released Monday by CU Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. 

State transportation officials addressed lawmakers Thursday about new ways to fund roads and bridges, and about being ready for any changes at the federal level.

Bente Birkeland

The state’s planning group on aging is calling for a new position to coordinate services, programs, spending and the needs of Colorado’s growing aging population. The group released recommendations on Tuesday. 

One of the first items on President-elect Donald Trump’s to-do list when he takes office will be to nominate a Supreme Court justice. While campaigning, Trump released a list of possible nominees, which included three judges from Colorado: Chief Judge Timothy Michael Tymkovich and Judge Neil McGill Gorsuch, both serving on the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and Justice Allison Hartwell Eid of the Colorado Supreme Court. 

Colorado will be part of a new pilot program to create a digital driver’s license.

More Republicans voted in Colorado’s presidential election compared to Democrats or Unaffiliated voters, according to the latest figures.

Nationally, the election of Donald Trump as the nation’s 45th president has many wondering about what comes next. In Colorado, the balance of power remains the same. State lawmakers are moving forward with their November calendar - mapping out their priorities for the upcoming legislative session - while trying to figure out what the new congress and administration will mean for state policies.

Governor John Hickenlooper presented his $29 billion budget proposal to lawmakers on the joint budget committee Monday. He said some cuts are necessary to close a shortfall. 

State lawmakers and the Governor are still coming to terms with Donald Trump’s surprising presidential win, and wondering how his administration and the new Congress could impact policies in Colorado.

On the eve of Election Day, Republicans in Colorado have turned in more ballots compared to Democrats and unaffiliated voters. This is a switch from earlier returns.

The gap is narrowing between Republicans and Democrats who have turned in ballots so far in Colorado. 

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton may be getting all the attention, but voters in Colorado also have 26 other presidential candidates to choose from.  

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams says the state’s voting system is secure. This comes after Donald Trump expressed concerns about the mail ballot process over the weekend.

Governor John Hickenlooper’s nearly $29 billion budget proposed for the next fiscal year would increase state spending, but also make cuts in key areas. 

The presidential race has taken so much attention it can be easy to forget about the local races that will determine which political party controls the Colorado Statehouse.

Mail ballots from this year’s election are starting to be returned.

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About 50 people recently weighed in on ColoradoCare at an event hosted by KUNC and the Fort Collins Coloradoan.

Opponents for a measure that would allow terminally ill patients to take medication to end their lives launched statewide television ads Wednesday.

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