Daniel Shaw

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Daniel Shaw  is a freelance writer and musician living in Woody Creek, Colorado, with his wife, Isa Catto Shaw, an artist, and their two children, Fiona and Duncan. He has written for The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, Grist.org and for numerous magazines, including Aspen Sojourner, on subjects ranging from flyfishing to the economic plight of Native Americans to the effects of climate change on the Roaring Fork Valley. He reviewed music in Los Angeles for Daily Variety and the LA Weekly, spent several years traveling the world writing about the commercial fishing and aquaculture industries and was a founding editor of Simply Seafood and Spa magazines. As a Washington, D.C., bureau chief during the second Clinton administration, he reported for a nationwide group of daily legal newspapers on the White House, Congress and the Supreme Court, before going to New York as a staff writer for The American Lawyer magazine. He also served as press secretary for the Navajo Nation, the country’s largest Native American tribe, in Window Rock, Arizona. As a blues, rock and country harmonica player, Daniel has played live with numerous national, regional and local acts and has logged many hours of studio time recording sessions for albums and commercials. In the nonprofit world, he served for nine years on the board of directors of the American Farmland Trust, as well as on the boards of the Aspen Community Foundation and the Aspen Writers Foundation.  Currently, he is an advisor to Island Press, the Washington, DC-based publisher of scientific and environmental books, and serves on the board of trustees of Aspen Country Day School.

Richard Loren

Nov 16, 2014
Photo from http://highnotes.org/

From the author’s website:

He started as a music agent at the Agency for the Performing Arts in New York City and promoted the ascendancy of rock ‘n’ roll in the United States from 1966-69. He scouted, signed, and worked with, new and up-and-coming artists and groups—most notably, Jefferson Airplane, The Doors, Chambers Brothers, Iron Butterfly, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Steppenwolf, Love, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGee and Tim Buckley.

In 1970, he moved to the San Francisco Bay Area where he worked as Jerry Garcia’s personal manager. He worked closely with the Garcia-Saunders Band, and facilitated the formation of Old & In the Way—a bluegrass band comprised of Jerry Garcia, David Grisman, Peter Rowan, John Kahn and Vassar Clements.

Gram Slaton

Nov 2, 2014
Aspen Peak Magazine http://aspenpeak-magazine.com/galleries/the-7908-aspen-songwriters-festival

Gram Slaton has been Executive Director of the Wheeler Opera House since October 2005. After 9 years, Slaton is stepping down in mid-December to move back to his hometown of Charlottesville, Virginia. Over his tenure, Slaton has overseen $7.5 million dollars in improvements to the historic venue.

John Waite

Oct 19, 2014

"Songs, and songwriting keeps me inspired, moving forward. I tend to scribble down notes, lyrics or just random thoughts on pieces of paper, backs of cigarette packs, sometimes on my shirt cuff. Rock n’ roll is closest thing I’ve got to a spiritual power. It’s been the higher voice in my life and it’s never let me down."

So says legendary singer-songwriter John Waite, whose career as a solo artist and fronting the iconic bands The Babys and Bad English has spanned nearly four decades. Waite recently released a new career retrospective, BEST. The album features 18 handpicked songs that reflect a remarkable body of work, including eleven studio hits -- three of which were recently re-recorded -- five live songs, and two unplugged tracks.

Waite has been successfully writing, recording and performing some of the most listenable, enduring and appreciated popular music for more than 35 years. He rose to fame as bassist and lead vocalist for The Babys, who rocketed to Top 20 chart positions with a pair of infections hits - “Isn’t it Time” from the band’s 1977 sophomore LP, Broken Heart and the monster ballad, “Every Time I Think of You” off 1978’s Head First.

After the breakup of The Babys--prompted by a serious injury to Waite in 1980 when he was pulled from the stage by an overzealous fan during an encore--Waite began an abundant and prodigious solo career, ignited by the well-received 1982 release, Ignition, which featured the hit single, “Change.”  John’s next solo effort, 1984’s No Brakes, did exactly what the title inferred, barreling at runaway train speed to international acclaim and U.S. platinum success thanks to the smash hit, “Missing You,” which did not stop until it reached Number 1 on the Billboard’s Hot 100 Singles, Album Rock Tracks and Adult Contemporary charts. The following up single, “Tears” was a top 10 hit on the Billboard Mainstream Rock charts.

In 1988, a reunion with former Baby’s band mates, Jonathan Cain and Ricky Phillips –along with uber-guitarist Neal Schon from Journey and drummer Deen Castronovo –resulted in the John Waite fronted supergroup, Bad English. And in 1989, the group’s ballad, “When I See You Smile,” – penned by Grammy-winning songwriter, Diane Warren – went to Number 1 on Billboard’s Hot 100 and was certified Gold. The album reached Top Five and sold more than two million units in the U.S. alone. Bad English released two albums before breaking up in 1992.

Since returning to the recording studio and concert trek as a solo artist in 1995, John has produced a string of solid, existentially eccentric, courageously eclectic and blisteringly electric rock n’ roll records, including 1995’s Temple Bar, 1997’s When You Were Mine, 2001’s Figure in a Landscape, 2004’s The Hard Way, 2006’s Downtown: Journey of a Heart, 2010’s In Real Time and 2011's Rough and Tumble, the title track of which earned Waite a Grammy nomination.

http://www.johnwaiteworldwide.com

Jim Lewis

Oct 12, 2014
Daniel Shaw

Jim Lewis has managed to survive nearly 40 years in the music business as a manager, producer and  record company executive. He's done it all. After graduating at the top of his class from Julliard, the bass prodigy took a sharp turn into the world of rock and roll and landed in its epicenter: Atlantic Records. As the assistant to Atlantic's legendary head Ahmet Ertegun, Lewis found himself in the company of the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and dozens of other acts that helped forge rock as we know it.

Parker Millsap

Oct 5, 2014

At only 21 years of age, Oklahoma native Parker Millsap is quickly making a name for himself with his captivating live performances, soulful sound, and character-driven narratives. Since the release of his self-titled debut album earlier this year, he has garnered a nomination for the Americana Music Association's 2014 Emerging Artist of the Year and has received praise from The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, American Songwriter, The Boston Globe, and NPR, to name a few.

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