Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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Thompson Divide Coalition

The Thompson Divide Coalition hopes a successful negotiation with an energy company in Gunnison will set a precedent closer to home. 

The Coalition is working to keep natural gas drilling out of the Divide, southwest of Carbondale. Three companies have undeveloped leases. The second largest, Gunnison Energy, this week agreed to protect the land surface in the Divide through methods like directional drilling. Zane Kessler is with the Coalition.

Creative Commons/Flickr/mariordo59

The City of Aspen is looking to plug in an effort to decrease its carbon footprint. 

Last year nineteen percent of Aspen’s greenhouse gas emissions came from vehicles and buses moving, sometimes crawling, through town. Tyler Svitak with the Denver group Clean Cities Coalition did a study. He told city council Tuesday it recommends plug-in electric cars to replace aging city vehicles and...

Facebook/Aspen Community School

Staff at the Aspen Community School in Woody Creek are moving into their renovated campus this week ahead of classes starting next month. The public charter school raised millions to replace its outdated school building and gymnasium. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to Skye Skinner of Compass, which operates the community school.

Skye Skinner is Executive Director of Compass, which operates the Aspen Community School. The school still has plans to build a new music and science building.

Marci Krivonen

A Carbondale-area ranch is seeking advice from one of the foremost experts on animal husbandry. Temple Grandin visited Sustainable Settings July 28th. She spoke with ranchers about animal behavior and consulted on a planned construction project. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A big beige and white dairy cow ambles into the milking room at Sustainable Settings farm and ranch. Herdsman Zopher Sabo is milking Ruby as Temple Grandin looks on.

"She’s nice and relaxed, chewing her cud," says Grandin. "She wouldn’t be doing that if she wasn’t relaxed.”

Facebook/Rachel Richards

In June the Pitkin County Commissioners sent a resolution to Colorado’s congressional delegation, decrying a national effort to transfer federal lands to state ownership. Advocates say it would improve access, environmental health and productivity on land managed by the Forest Service and BLM. Commissioner Rachel Richards told Marci Krivonen the effort would spell trouble for Pitkin County.

Rachel Richards is a Pitkin County Commissioner. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. In future weeks, we’ll air the other side of the argument.

Concerns about how Aspen is developing prompted a city councilman Monday to ask for an analysis of development projects already approved. 

Aspen resident Ward Hauenstein told council Monday he’s worried.

"City government has had the vision and courage to limit growth. I fear that our representatives have lost that vision and courage."

Creative Commons/Flickr/Medill DC

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain spoke in Aspen Saturday. The republican discussed the Iran deal, cyber attacks, Donald Trump and ISIS. 

McCain’s talk was part of the Aspen Security Forum. In fighting the Islamic terror group ISIS, he says the U.S. has no direct strategy.

Aspen Valley Foundation

A failed effort to develop a retirement community in Basalt is disappointing but not surprising to officials involved. 

Tom Griffiths, with the now defunct Aspen Valley Foundation, knew 19 months ago seeing the project through was a long shot. The foundation had lost its CEO and Griffiths began meeting with local governments, hospitals and banks. He wanted someone to take over the $105 million project.

Marci Krivonen

To make way for a new home in Aspen’s west end neighborhood, the property owner recently cut down several trees. That kind of removal must pass muster with the City of Aspen, which considers the trees in town a “community forest.” Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with city forester Ben Carlsen about when removing a tree is permitted.

Ben Carlsen is the City of Aspen Forester. He says the tree mitigation costs for the home on Aspen Street reached nearly $40,000.

Marci Krivonen

The $7.5 million dollar sale of Aspen’s Smuggler Mine Friday marks another chapter for a piece of land rich with history. The limited liability company Aspen Green Mountain purchased the 29-acre parcel from a group of friends whose connection with Smuggler includes heartache and hard work. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Dana Knight loads a trailer on a cloudy, rainy day. The now former owner of the Smuggler Mine property ran an auto repair shop on it for years, not far from the mine’s entrance.

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