Marci Krivonen


Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways to Connect


Donations are pouring in to preserve an area used by Aspen school children for outdoor learning. Since fundraising started, more than $50,000 has been raised for the “Marble Basecamp.” Marci Krivonen has more.

Marci Krivonen

In 2013, the head of the Pitkin County Library said she’d pursue a smaller, less expensive library renovation after voters rejected a property tax.

Marci Krivonen

Aspen mayor Steve Skadron is heading to Paris early next month (Dec.) for the United Nations Climate Change Conference. The mayor of Paris invited Skadron to be part of a group of local leaders who pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in their cities. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen caught up with Skadron who says he’s excited to be part of such a critical event.

Steve Skadron is mayor of Aspen. In early December he’ll head to Paris for the world climate talks. The city is paying for the trip, estimated to be about $2000. 

White River National Forest

Forest Service officials say early data shows record numbers of visitors to high use areas in the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness over the summer.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Aspen Mountain will open early thanks to recent storms.

Hundreds honor veterans at an annual ceremony in the upper valley.

One in ten kids in Pitkin County is living in poverty.

Marci Krivonen

About 200 people packed into the Aspen firehouse Wednesday (11/11) for an annual ceremony honoring veterans. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The look of the forests in the Roaring Fork Valley may be dramatically different in the future. High elevation forests could be replaced with lower growing species like aspens. A new website shows how forests in the American West will look different under climate change. The local nonprofit Aspen Center for Environmental Studies worked with scientists to develop the site.

Jamie Werner is Forest Program Director at ACES. Her laptop’s propped open and she’s clicking around the site,

"So here we have Aspen Mountain and Aspen Highlands…”


There are avalanches being reported in the high country already. On Saturday, a skier triggered a large slide on a mountain near Gothic. Forecasters from the Colorado Avalanche Information Center say the activity is due to new and wind-drifted snow gathering on old, weak layers from storms in October. Brian Lazar is with the Center.

Brian Lazar is the Deputy Director of the Colorado Avalanche Information Center.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Parker Knight

About one in ten kids in Pitkin County are living in poverty. That’s according to a statewide study discussed in Aspen last week. Officials with the Colorado Children’s Campaign visited with parents, elected leaders and child care workers about their latest findings. Shirley Ritter is a child advocate who runs Kids First — an Aspen center subsidized by taxpayers. She spoke with Marci Krivonen.

Shirley Ritter directs Kids First for the city of Aspen. 

Marci Krivonen

With the legislative session about two months away, State Senator Kerry Donovan is preparing her legislative agenda. She represents Pitkin, Eagle and other Western Slope counties. This session, she says finding ways to provide internet in rural areas will be a top priority. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.