Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Roger Adams

The race for mayor in Aspen has become more heated as election day gets closer. Two people are running for the seat. Ballots will be counted May 5th. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen sat down with candidate Torre.

Torre isn’t a newcomer to city politics. He served eight years on council. This is his fifth attempt to become mayor. The tennis instructor has lived in town for two decades and says he’s running because he feels the public’s voice has been lost.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

RFTA gets millions for more parking, service, and facilities.

A Basalt woman is sentenced for causing a fatal accident last August.

Aspen Skiing Company and pro skier Alice McKennis look back on the season.

There’s a new book about Glenwood Springs history.

A nonprofit aims to restore part of the Crystal River in Carbondale.

And we find out about the country’s biggest conservation effort ever and a bird here in Colorado.

That’s ahead on Mountain Edition.

rfta.com

The Colorado Department of Transportation announced Wednesday its doling out more than 2 million dollars to the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority. 

Most of the money RFTA is receiving comes from the state’s Faster program, which collects money through car registration fees. RFTA’s also getting federal funds. Overall the agency will collect nearly $2.4 million to fund four separate projects.

Creative Commons/Flickr/madeleinehearn

The Pitkin County Commissioners aired several concerns about a plan to make the Aspen Valley Hospital and Pitkin County Health and Human Services campus smoke and tobacco free. 

The policy would apply to outdoor areas around the sprawling campus off Castle Creek Road. Besides the hospital and county building, the ban would apply to Whitcomb Terrace, hospital employee housing and Senior Services. Right now, most areas allow smoking 15 feet from a door.

Marci Krivonen

The month of April is when the Greater Sage Grouse does an elaborate dance to find a mate. The chicken-like bird lives in northwest Colorado and other western states and it’s population is shrinking. The largest conservation effort ever is underway to improve the bird’s habitat and prevent a federal “endangered” listing. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen visited the largest breeding grounds in the state, where the birds gather each year for their courtship dance.

Aspen/Snowmass

The Aspen Skiing Company closed the last of its resorts Sunday. Thousands of skiers and riders flocked to Aspen Mountain for late season powder. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen got a debrief from Ski Co. spokesman Jeff Hanle.

Now that the season’s over, the Aspen Skiing Company's workforce will shrink from 3500 people to 600.

Marci Krivonen

A Carbondale non profit is setting out to restore a section of the degraded Crystal River. The Aspen Valley Land Trust is partnering with the Town of Carbondale and a local subdivision to repair a 1.4 mile stretch through town. The plan is preliminary but aims to improve town parks and aquatic habitat and provide better fishing. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Connor Coleman with AVLT alongside the Crystal. He explained why the Crystal is in bad shape.

ourtownplanning.org

What’s next for a proposed development in downtown Basalt is a question mark after a majority of community and council members Tuesday said the plan needed reworking. 

More than 150 people were at Tuesday’s meeting. Many said they didn’t want to sacrifice open space for condos, according to the Aspen Times.

Developer Lowe Enterprises wants to build 40 condominiums and a boutique hotel on the site. It’s prime real estate: 2.3 acres close to the Roaring Fork River, where the Pan and Fork Mobile Home Park used to be. Lowe says one-third of the site would be open space.

Grassroots TV

The candidates running for Aspen City Council and mayor were grilled Thursday night at the annual Squirm Night forum. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Affordable housing, development and the residency of one candidate came up during the two hour forum in council chambers. Editors from local newspapers grilled the seven people running for two open seats on council.

One question asked the candidates to grade the City Manager’s Office. Retired affordable housing director Tom McCabe and former mayor Mick Ireland:

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

Glenwood Springs swears-in two new city council members.

Pitkin County judges rule on three high profile cases.

Ballots go in the mail to voters for Aspen’s spring election.

As the Aspen chamber of commerce comes under fire for a campaign.

We’ll find out which candidates in the Aspen race have raised the most money so far.

Questions are raised about the main affordable housing program in the Upper Valley.

We hear from a Forest Service District ranger about controlled burns.

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