Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

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APR Local News
6:00 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Black Bears Make Their Way Back Into Aspen

Two bears are spotted along the Hyman Avenue Mall in Aspen in 2007. This year the bear activity is picking up because berries aren't yet ripe in the high country.
Credit aspenpitkin.com

Bears are increasingly being drawn into Aspen this summer as their natural foods up high are late to bloom. Early Sunday a black bear swiped at a woman in a downtown alley. And, the number of bear-related calls to police have spiked in July. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

So far in 2014, the Aspen Police Department has handled 150 calls, from bears digging through garbage to questions about local trash laws. Five callers reported bears breaking into homes. Police Department spokesperson Blair Weyer says so far it’s a moderate year for bear activity.

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Mountain Edition
3:29 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Mountain Edition - July 24th, 2014

Good afternoon, and welcome to Mountain Edition.

You’ve probably noticed we’re in our summer pledge drive this week… so today we’re bringing you an update on the latest local news.

Like efforts to restrict drilling on the Thompson Divide… lots of business in the valley this summer... and what we know now about theories on who may have been involved in Nancy Pfister’s death.

Then we’ll hear some of our favorite stories over the last several months… One man says he’s the only Ute tribal member who lives in the Roaring Fork Valley.

And, we chat with a local rabbi considered one of the most inspiring in the country.

We’ll hear about one of the tough issues in the Roaring Fork Valley. Heroin overdoses have claimed several lives this year.

As for the pledge drive, thanks if you’ve already made a gift or renewed your membership. If not...it’s time.

Because nearly half of Aspen Public Radio’s funding comes from listeners like you. Please consider making a pledge, at whatever amount is comfortable.

Call us at 920- 9000 during regular business hours, or give anytime on the interwebs, that’s aspen public radio dot org.

We’ve got lots of good stories for you during this special pledge drive edition of Mountain Edition... starting now.

Thompson Divide
6:00 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Advocacy Group Looks To Forest Service Solution

The group working to protect the Thompson Divide area from natural gas development is awaiting a Forest Service plan.
Credit savethethompsondivide.org

Natural Gas drilling in an area near Carbondale known as the Thompson Divide is still a possibility, despite protest from many local residents. The group trying to stop it is hopeful a Forest Service plan, due out later this summer, will prevent future drilling.

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Environment
8:17 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Humankind's Changing Perception Of Nature

Susan McConnell is a professor at Stanford University. She spoke about humankind's changing relationship with nature in Aspen.
Credit Tim Grams/susankmcconnell.com

Over the years humankind’s relationship with nature has changed. According to one scientist, we’re now in an era where people deeply value nature because they depend on it. Stanford biology professor Susan McConnell gave a talk at the Aspen Disruption Summit over the weekend. She also spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

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Environment
9:29 am
Fri July 18, 2014

50 Years of Wilderness: The State Of Wild Places Today

Forest Service staff hikes through the Maroon Bells/Snowmass Wilderness. The area is seeing more visitors, especially at four "hot spots."
Credit United States Forest Service

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act and the challenges facing wild places today are different than they were in 1964. Some say it’s increasingly difficult to keep these areas wild and to get protection for new wilderness. The White River National Forest manages eight wilderness areas, including the popular Maroon Bells/Snowmass region near Aspen. In part two of our series, Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen examines the challenges facing the wilderness in our backyard.

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