Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Residents in the Mid-Valley saw federal agents in tactical gear this week. We’ll tell you why.

A police officer involved in a controversial arrest of an Aspen teenager says he’s leaving the department.

Proponents and opponents of a ballot measure to change Aspen’s land use code sound off at a town hall meeting.

A beloved restaurant in Aspen will keep its doors open longer than expected.

And, a popular Aspen bike-sharing program wants to expand its reach.

Kathryn Trauger is running for an at-large seat on Glenwood Springs City Council. The long-time resident has made her opinions known on her blog. Now she wants a voice on city council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A few years ago Trauger says she became discouraged with some things happening in city government.

"I was seeing a lot of misinformation and some things that were not communicated correctly, so I decided to start writing a blog."

Facebook/U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security

A spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security confirmed special agents with the department were in the Mid-Valley this week. Federal vehicles were seen in the Willits and El Jebel areas. 

Marci Krivonen

In May, the bike sharing service WE-cycle will reopen for the summer season. The Aspen-based service is seeing success. WE-cycle provides bikes for short-term users at stations around town. The idea is to reduce car trips with the service.

2014 was WE-cycle's second year of operation. The organization saw a 76 percent jump in ridership compared to its inaugural year. Mirte Mallory with WE-cycle says many users live Downvalley, and use the bikes as the final leg of their commute.

Tony Hershey

Three people are vying to fill one at-large seat on the Glenwood Springs City Council. The contenders vary on their reasons for running, but all say it’s a crucial election. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen caught up with candidate Tony Hershey.

Reporter: "Why did you decide to run for Glenwood Springs City Council?"

Hershey: "I think there’s a lot of change coming and it’s an important time. I think the city definitely needs to move in a different direction."

Marci Krivonen

Our series examining the candidates running for office in Glenwood Springs, continues. Our focus is on the contested races. Today we introduce you to the second candidate vying for the Ward One seat on City Council. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Russ Arensman wants to get back on city council. The former foreign journalist served a four year term that ended in 2011. He ran again and lost by four votes.

He thinks the city’s on the cusp of an economic rebound and believes local government can bolster growth.

Marci Krivonen

All this week Aspen Public Radio will be introducing you to the candidates running in contested races for Glenwood Springs City Council. Two spots are open on the seven-member board. Ballots will be counted April 7th. It’s a critical election for the city. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains why.

REPORTER: "Transportation issues are what make this election so critical for the City of Glenwood. What comes after the Grand Avenue Bridge replacement is one issue the candidates will have to deal with.”

Marci Krivonen

This election voters in Aspen will choose from a full list of candidates. A history of several candidates running for local office isn’t uncommon in Aspen. In fact, it’s the norm. This year, two people are running for a two-year mayor’s term. Seven are running for two open council seats. Council terms are four years. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Bill Stirling was mayor of Aspen for eight years from the mid 1980’s to the early 90’s. In one race, he decided to meet the public outdoors.

aspenpitkin.com

Staffers at the city-owned Aspen Recreation Center are updating their business plan in an effort to save taxpayers money. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the facility is heavily subsidized.

Taxpayers pitch in to pay for community recreation centers around the country. Tim Anderson is Director for the Aspen Recreation Center that has a $4 million annual budget. He says the facility raises more than half of that. The rest is subsidized by city government.

Welcome to Mountain Edition.

Elected leaders in Aspen choose a brewery - slash - small business incubator to fill the city-owned Old Power House.

Unstable snow on local ski slopes prompts the Aspen Skiing Company to temporarily close terrain.

A professional cross country ski racer is home from the World Championships. Aspen’s Simi Hamilton looks back on his season.

There won’t be a sentence for a fatal highway 133 crash for another month.

We hear from the head of Colorado’s largest oil and gas organization about why she’s leaving her post.

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