Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

apcha.org

Aspen’s workforce housing program is collecting data from residents as part of an update to its guidelines. 

The Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority started disseminating surveys to workers early in July. So far, 665 people have filled them out. The survey asks about income, your profession and whether you live in workforce housing.

Right now, policy decisions are being made with old data, says Housing Authority director Mike Kosdrosky. The new information will provide a clearer picture of what’s needed.

aspenpitkin.com

Aspen City Council is getting behind a national effort to address climate change. On Monday council gave initial support for what’s called a “Carbon Fee and Dividend” proposal. 

In June seven Roaring Fork Valley residents, including an Aspen city staffer, traveled to Washington DC to sway elected officials to support the Carbon Fee and Dividend policy proposal. It would apply a fee to carbon-based fuels. Revenues from the fee would be returned to households across the country.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Zdenko Zivkovic

The number of low-income Medicaid patients accessing care in area emergency rooms is on the rise. The increase - seen at Aspen Valley and Valley View Hospitals - follows a national trend in states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

In 2014 the amount of business Aspen Valley Hospital did for Medicaid patients was triple the number in 2013. Hospital officials attribute the rise to Colorado expanding its Medicaid program.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition. 

A Snowmass Town councilman faces a felony charge after allegedly trashing a jail cell.

Aspenites will probably vote on a proposed affordable lodge.

A judge considers whether the Aspen Skiing Company is at fault for a mudslide that damaged a home.

We take a look at diversity in the Roaring Fork Valley arts community.

We also get a tour of an innovative marijuana grow facility in the Valley.

Marci Krivonen

A study is underway in the upper valley (Aspen/Pitkin County) to see what people are tossing in the trash. It’s a dirty job, but the goal is to find ways to get more people to recycle and extend the life of the Pitkin County landfill. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

A front loader dumps bags of trash onto a tarp at the Pitkin County landfill. It’s garbage from households and businesses from Carbondale to Aspen.

Nearby a group of ten workers in white safety suits is picking through the trash.

blm.gov

Recreation and oil and gas development in our region are impacted by a new plan released Wednesday (7/8/15) by the Bureau of Land Management. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

The Resource Management Plan for the Colorado River Valley Field Office applies to BLM lands in six counties including Garfield, Eagle and Pitkin. It updates a 1984 plan and directs management for the next two decades.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Paul Downey

The Great Recession may be in the rearview mirror, but it left poverty in its wake. Pitkin County’s Health and Human Services Department reports more people living in poverty. Director of the Department Nan Sundeen says a quarter of residents earn slightly more than federal poverty wages. So, many single adults are making just $23,000 a year. She spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen.

Nan Sundeen is director of Pitkin County Health and Human Services. Next week, we’ll examine access to health care for the poor.

For decades the Aspen Valley Land Trust has kept open spaces in the Roaring Fork Valley from being developed. Now, the organization’s director is preparing to step down. Martha Cochran sat down with Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen. She says the work AVLT has done to permanently preserve land is not just critical for views and historic land uses, like ranching, it’s important for wildlife.

Martha Cochran is executive director of Aspen Valley Land Trust. She’s stepping down at the end of the year, but intends to stay in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Creative Commons/Flickr/David Leo Veksler

The City of Aspen will target homes and neighborhoods in a push to reduce its carbon footprint. The latest inventory of pollutants shows Aspen is falling behind in meeting goals to reduce emissions. 

Since 2004, greenhouse gas emissions in Aspen have dropped by 7.4 percent. Ashley Perl is with the City’s Canary Initiative that tracks this data.

"That’s no small task for our town because we’ve been growing a lot and our economy has grown as well, and we’ve enjoyed a great quality of life while continuing to reduce emissions.”

silverpeakapothecary.com

The marijuana industry in Colorado got some attention at the Aspen Ideas Festival last week. Festival participants toured a grow operation near Basalt and heard from experts about the somewhat bumpy rollout of recreational pot. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

There’s a few rules before you take a tour of High Valley Farms near Basalt.

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