Marci Krivonen


Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Creative Commons/Flickr/Scott Davidson

Snowmass Village Police continue to investigate a report last week of a sexual assault. A woman walking home from a friend’s house was reportedly attacked. The investigation is ongoing but few details are emerging. Law enforcement says such a sensitive crime needs a certain level of privacy, especially in a small town. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Reporter: "The occurrence of sexual assault crimes like this, how common is it that your department handles such cases?"

Chief Brian Olson: "Looking back at statistics, we investigate two cases a year."

Creative Commons/Flickr/Carolyn Cuskey

A new water agreement will send additional water from Ruedi Reservoir near Basalt, to endangered fish in the Colorado River. 

Marci Krivonen

The Forest Service was met by protesters Tuesday (9/2/15) in a remote area in the Thompson Divide, southwest of Carbondale. The agency is starting a review of a proposal to drill an exploratory well. But, the group gathered doesn’t want any natural gas drilling. They say the area’s natural environment is too valuable. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s tough to imagine coming up here for anything other than peaceful moments in the great outdoors. But about 40 people Tuesday maneuvered mud-caked roads to protest drilling. Some even slept over.

Creative Commons/Flickr/Brian Turner

The field of candidates to fill a vacant judge post that serves the Roaring Fork Valley, has been narrowed down. 

Facebook/Verena Mallory Trail

A lawsuit was filed Monday (8/31) in an effort to keep a popular connector trail open. It links up to the Hunter Creek trail in Aspen’s backyard. 

Marci Krivonen

The first day of school for students at a public charter school near Woody Creek meant more than new teachers and textbooks. Kids at the K-through-8 Aspen Community School spent their first day in a new school building. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen has more.

Students plopped in a semi-circle on the floor of the new Aspen Community School cheer loudly. It’s the first all-school assembly and Principal Jim Gilchrist is laying down ground rules.

Airport and local emergency responders will get practice dealing with a full-scale simulated plane crash at the Aspen Pitkin County Airport Tuesday (8/31).

Creative Commons/Flickr/woodleywonderworks

Now that kids are back to school, some teachers are making up ground lost over the summer. Students can lose about a month’s worth of reading, language and math skills when they’re not in school. The setback can be especially acute for students learning English. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen spoke with Susan Gonzalez, who wrote about this “summer slide” for Chalkbeat Colorado, an education news website.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Will Carbondale get a new City Market? The development proposal is laid out at a packed public meeting.

Changes are in the works for an overcrowded midvalley intersection.

The Aspen Skiing Company is hoping to attract visitors from countries where more people are spending money on winter sports, like China.

The number of hospital beds for the mentally ill is dismal, especially on the Western Slope.

A Denver-based musician known for his contemplative folk songs visits Aspen.

Creative Commons/Flickr/bluesbby

The number of elderly residents getting involved in Pitkin County’s Senior Services’ offerings is growing. 

The first half of 2015 saw twice the number of new senior registrations for programs like nutrition, compared to the same period in 2014. Pitkin County Senior Services offers things like transportation, home delivered meals and exercise classes. Senior Services Director Marty Ames says the Aspen Recreation Center is also seeing more seniors.