Marci Krivonen

Reporter

Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them. She began in broadcasting in Missoula, Montana where she anchored Montana Public Radio's local Evening Edition news program. She then picked up a camera and tripod and worked for Missoula's local CBS television station as a reporter. Shortly after that, she returned to radio and became the Assistant News Director at a radio station in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Marci began at Aspen Public Radio in 2007 as the station's morning host and reporter. Although you can occasionally hear Marci in the mornings, she is now quite content to be sleeping in and reporting all day. When not at the station, Marci is on her road bike, meeting people, or skiing.

Ways To Connect

Facebook/Aspen Police Dept.

The Aspen Police Department is fully staffed again, after a handful of officers announced earlier this year they were leaving. Four officers are joining the department. Two graduated from the Colorado Law Enforcement Training Academy on Friday.

Two of the new officers are already residents of the Roaring Fork Valley - Adriano Minniti and Seth DelGrasso. Josh Uhernik is from out of state. Duxton Milam is from the Front Range. Two of the four bring previous law enforcement experience.

Pitkin County Sheriff's Office

A tanker truck crashed on Capitol Creek Road in Old Snowmass Thursday afternoon, spilling fuel onto the landscape. 

The accident happened shortly before 1 o’clock in a rural area across from what’s known as the “llama and alpaca ranch.” One vehicle was involved: the fuel truck. Photos show it upside down on a grassy area, possibly resting on a ditch.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

Today we have a special election show featuring the candidates running for office in Aspen.

Seven people are vying for two open seats on city council. Two are running for the mayor’s post.

Among other questions, we asked the candidates about a controversial ballot question called Referendum One. If passed, it would amend the City Charter to require a public vote on development projects with exceptions for height, size, parking or affordable housing.

Marci Krivonen

Beds and couches have replaced groceries in a key downtown building in Basalt. The Habitat for Humanity Restore opened its doors last Wednesday in the old Clark’s Market space. 

The non profit furniture and donation center has received a positive response from the community, according to managers. The store opened fully stocked with donations from a high end lodge in Beaver Creek. A percentage of sales go to Habitat for Humanity’s home building fund.

The 18,000 square foot space sat empty for months before Habitat moved in. Jeff Sirbu is with the local affiliate.

Pitkin County

The radio system used by public safety agencies in the Roaring Fork Valley is encountering problems and Pitkin County is considering a multi-million dollar fix. 

Law enforcement and fire agencies have complained of interference, signal distortion and the inability to communicate with regional and state agencies that use a different system. For example, Pitkin County’s snow plow drivers can’t communicate with the Colorado Department of Transportation. And, the bus system’s radios don’t communicate with the Pitkin County Sheriff’s Office.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife

A mudslide near downtown Basalt has forced Colorado Parks and Wildlife to lower the water level at a popular fishing hole. 

The small slide happened on a hillside near a reservoir at the Lake Christine State Wildlife Area over the weekend of April 18th and 19th. The slide took out a few trees, but didn’t damage structures. Mud slid all the way to Two Rivers Road.

Marci Krivonen

Basalt Town Council Tuesday approved a “future roadmap to development” for downtown. The decision came after more than two hours of discussion and public comment.

The board voted 5-to-2 to support the resolution. Mayor Jacque Whitsitt and councilman Gary Tennenbaum voted against it.

Roger Adams

Steve Skadron is hoping to hang on to the mayor’s seat in Aspen. He has one challenger in the May election but says his proven leadership will earn him votes. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Skadron has served two terms on council. This would be his second term as mayor. He runs a marketing business and has lived in town for two decades. He says he’s pursuing re-election as a commitment to public service.

Roger Adams

The race for mayor in Aspen has become more heated as election day gets closer. Two people are running for the seat. Ballots will be counted May 5th. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen sat down with candidate Torre.

Torre isn’t a newcomer to city politics. He served eight years on council. This is his fifth attempt to become mayor. The tennis instructor has lived in town for two decades and says he’s running because he feels the public’s voice has been lost.

Good afternoon, it’s Mountain Edition.

RFTA gets millions for more parking, service, and facilities.

A Basalt woman is sentenced for causing a fatal accident last August.

Aspen Skiing Company and pro skier Alice McKennis look back on the season.

There’s a new book about Glenwood Springs history.

A nonprofit aims to restore part of the Crystal River in Carbondale.

And we find out about the country’s biggest conservation effort ever and a bird here in Colorado.

That’s ahead on Mountain Edition.

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