art

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

Aspen’s real estate economy is slowly digging out… we’ll get some of the finer details.

There’s a new art museum in the Roaring Fork Valley… no, not in Aspen. It’s near Carbondale.

This week Pitkin County Republicans rallied around candidates for this fall’s elections including a Congressman hoping to become a U. S. Senator. We’ll hear his pitch on why he’s the right person for the job.

Finally, we sit down with Oscar winning filmmaker and artist Steve McQueen, as he spends time in Snowmass Village this week.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition.

File Photo - Anderson Ranch Arts Center

An Oscar winning filmmaker and artist is taking part in a symposium at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village this week. Steve McQueen’s most recent film is “12 Years a Slave” – a historical biopic about a freeman who endured slavery in 18-40s America. McQueen is taking part in an event entitled “Making the Change They Want to See” - about the intersection of art and social change. Aspen Public Radio’s Rob St. Mary spoke with McQueen about his work and process this week.

Aspen Art Museum

Aug 6, 2014
Roger Adams

Seven years since its conception, the new Aspen Art Museum opens this weekend with a 24 hour non-stop gala celebration.  Designed by internationally famous architect Shigeru Ban, the latticed surrounded cube cost 45 million dollar to build.  And, while the museum’s director and patrons are elated at how the building looks, the reaction in town has ranged from ridicule to open hostility

Photo from Change.Org Petition

An installation at the soon to be open Aspen Art Museum is getting some negative attention via an on-line petition. The change.org petition started by Lisbeth Oden of Aspen calls for the museum to remove iPads that have been glued to the shells of three live tortoises featured in a roof top garden. The iPads project video footage of local ghost towns filmed by the turtles themselves. The idea is that forgotten stories of the once prosperous towns are retold from the tortoises’ perspectives. The petition calls the exhibit abuse and an unnecessary exploitation of the animals. By 6pm Tuesday over 200 people had signed the petition. The Aspen Art Museum is allowing some patrons in this week for previews. The facility opens to everyone with a 24-hour celebration Saturday. The tortoises are to be part of the opening along with performance art, music and even dream analysis.

Good afternoon and welcome to Mountain Edition.

It’s been a busy summer in the Roaring Fork Valley so far. For some communities, it’s an important economic boost.

The U.S. Justice Department fines Citigroup for misconduct that helped fuel the recession. We talk to Colorado’s US Attorney, who was part of the investigation.

Colorado names Carbondale a creative district candidate. Turns out, much of the town’s economy is centered around ingenuity.

We’ll head to a shooting range near Basalt, where a group of women are learning to cast...and blast.

And, it’s the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act this year. We’ll introduce you to a group of women who fought to protect the Maroon Bells/Snowmass area.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition... right now.

After a series of festival screenings for her new film, Aspen native Naomi McDougall Jones has returned home to screen her new project “Imagine I’m Beautiful” to a hometown audience on Saturday at the Wheeler Opera House. Aspen Public Radio’s Rob St. Mary spoke to McDougall Jones about the film recently. She says she wanted to bring the film to Aspen at her earliest opportunity not only because she’s from here, but because the community helped to make the film possible. 

Carbondale Public Arts Commission

Carbondale will get several new pieces of public art this week. The sculptures from around the country will dot busy intersections and sidewalks. It’s the 12th year of the Art Around Town exhibition and, once erected, the sculptures stay in place for a full year. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Sue Edelstein, a member of the Town-appointed Public Arts Commission. She says 60 artists submitted work and thirteen pieces were chosen.

Jill Oberman, Executive Director, Alex Knipe, ceramicist and teacher, and Diane Keanie, Founding Director, all of the Carbondale Clay Center, discuss the importance of art. The Center is an important institution in the Carbondale art scene. The center offers classes, residencies, a gallery space, private lessons, and drop-in workshops for all ages and ability levels. The center is open to everyone and aims to help foster creativity and get people excited to get their hands dirty. 

Visit www.CarbondaleClay.org to learn more about the Carbondale Clay Center's programs and how you can get your hands muddy. 

Angie Callen is the Executive Director of Aspen's Red Brick Center for the Arts (Aspen Public Radio's landlord). Angie talks about all the changes to the facility and the programs, including what's coming this summer.

http://www.aspenart.org/

Poem: Mnemosyne Forgets

Mar 5, 2014

The long bowed wood left marks on the hardwood floor,

so we tried to keep the rocker on a rug.

It didn't work and every house would have these streaks

where our rocking had stripped wax off.

Memory is a hesitant thing,

a thing best left on shelves for rainy days.

What troubles me is remembering,

remembering August ninth-

nineteen ninety five.

A boundary day, a before and after day.

He wasn't just a guitar player missing the upper bird digits of his wing-ed finger.

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