Aspen TREE Co-Directors Eden Vardy and River Morgan share their vision for Aspen TREE in the coming years, and discuss the power of thinking positively about environmentalism. The organization has ambitious plans for growth and expansion, which includes a model for up-and-coming farmers. 

Aspen TREE Board Vice President Michael Miracle also contributes. 

Learn more about Aspen TREE, and their upcoming programs, events, and volunteer opportunities at

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

An increased budget for programming allowed the venue to bring in bigger names, and right now, it looks like that may have been achieved. The Beach Boys and comedian Kevin Smith both perform in December.

Barbara Platts

 The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) will be paving near the roundabout at the entrance to Aspen tomorrow morning, Oct. 12, from 9:30 a.m. until noon.


Aspen TREE Co-Directors Eden Vardy and River Morgan share the history of the organization and the inspiration behind the work of Aspen TREE. Vardy became inspired after taking an Environmental Literacy class at Aspen High School, which would lead him to pursue his undergraduate and graduate degrees focused on positive environmentalism. 

The organization is located at Cozy Point Ranch, where they operate the FarmPark,. The park includes a greenhouse dome, food garden, alpacas, goats, chickens, rabbits, and more, and is open 365-days a year and open to the public. 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

The Wheeler Real Estate Transfer Tax, and the multiple questions in Basalt about the Pan and Fork land parcel, will both have effects on art-focused nonprofits. Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort spoke with Gena Buhler from the Wheeler Opera House and Genna Moe from The Art Base to see how each would be affected by November’s votes.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Aspen Ruggerfest kicked off its 49th year yesterday. There’s a hidden challenge aside from the two teams on the field though.

Aaron Britt is a veteran rugby player. He played wide receiver on his college football team. His nickname is “AB Love”. He plays on a team called the Misfits, based in Denver.

But even though he plays at altitude, coming to Aspen is a big step, he said.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

For more than 25 years, Jim Horowitz has been putting on some of the biggest music events in the Roaring Fork Valley. But it wasn’t always that way.

Courtesy Photo

The Motherlode Volleyball Classic begins its 44th year today. The tournament takes place in multiple parks throughout Aspen and features over 500 teams.


The beach volleyball event attracts teams from across the country, including both professionals and amateurs. Some participants are as old as 60.


Proceeds from concessions will support the Snowmass Rodeo, and the Aspen High School Girl’s Volleyball Team will be hosting a fundraiser during the tournament.

The event runs through Monday.

Courtesy Photo

Shakespeare in the Park has been an Aspen staple for a decade. “As You Like It” is one of Shakespeare’s more fantastical plays, and is this year’s work of choice from the Bard. But rather than using more fantastical tropes like in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” “As You Like It” is described as a pastoral comedy.


When Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson returned from their tours of duty in Iraq, they came back changed men. They were dealing with moral injuries, more than physical ones. Both were dealing with post traumatic stress disorder.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Mark Beauregard was a reporter, but made a decision to write a book after thinking about Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. Melville had a close relationship with Nathaniel Hawthorne, another American writer. They wrote letters to each other that suggest that they were more than friends. Melville’s writing was often about his life, yet Moby Dick is almost always seen as an allegory. Beauregard was struck by this comparison and decided to write about the relationship between Melville and Hawthorne.


Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Back in the 1970s,  while Andy Stone worked at the Aspen Times, he was questioning himself. He felt that all newspaper reporters had a novel in them. So he decided to follow suit.

His first novel, “Song of the Kingdom”, was published by Doubleday in 1979. After that book’s release, he decided he’d take another crack at the publishing world.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Colorado is investing millions of dollars in the arts throughout the state. The money supports film, public art programs and the state’s creative district program, which tries to help rural economies grow through the arts. In the Roaring Fork Valley, municipalities are figuring out ways to incorporate public art, and make their towns a great place to support artists. In just the past month, the relationship between the arts and government has evolved.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Tonight, Aspen City Council will hear from the Parks Department about how to handle new public art pieces and the installation process.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

This year's Red Brick Center for the Arts Plein Air Festival comes to a close Sunday.  “Plein Air” is a French term, meaning “in full or open air”. That’s the attraction for the nearly two dozen participants, including Peter Campbell, of Durango.

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is presenting his book, The Opposite of Woe: Life in Beer and Politics, this afternoon at Explore Booksellers in Aspen

 The Aspen Art Museum held its annual ArtCrush fundraising event on Friday. The museum netted $2.5 million, and was exactly what was expected, according to Aspen Art Museum CEO Heidi Zuckerman. That number is the same compared to last year’s event.

The “Wheeler Wins” program was launched in November by the Wheeler Opera House as a way to make shows more affordable and provide other benefits. There are more than 400 members so far.


Wheeler executive director Gena Buhler said the membership numbers are encouraging.


That’s especially important to her because last week, the City of Aspen gave the Wheeler Opera House over $100,000 to help bring in bigger acts. The money came from the real estate transfer tax.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

It was announced last week that the Wheeler Opera House received over $100,000 to supplement its programming budget. Executive director Gena Buhler said this new money will mean bigger acts, and steadier ticket prices for locals. Buhler spoke with arts reporter Patrick Fort about what this all means.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

explore. evolve. elevate. opens tonight at the Red Brick Center for the Arts.


Ceramic artist Michael Bonds is featured in the show, as well as Molly Peacock. The exhibition also includes a retrospective on the work of Betty Weiss, who passed away in November.


Weiss had a studio in the Red Brick for almost two decades. Red Brick executive director Angie Callen told Aspen Public Radio in November the 90-year-old artist was an institution in the building.