Basalt

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The problem of domestic violence is being talked about nationally after footage of abuse by an NFL player went public earlier this week. And,  the National Domestic Violence Hotline reportedly has seen a spike in calls.

Marci Krivonen

School started this week for K-through-twelve students across the Roaring Fork Valley. This school year, kids in the Roaring Fork School District will see subtle changes. The district operates schools from Glenwood Springs to Basalt, and it’s rolling out a “visioning process.” Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke with Superintendent Diana Sirko about what the process means for kids in the classroom.

Diana Sirko is Superintendent of Schools for the Roaring Fork School District. It operates twelve schools, serving 5800 students in Basalt, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs. 

Marci Krivonen

Colorado State Patrol responded to two fatal accidents in our region Saturday. The first happened near Emma, on Highway 82. A 53-year-old Aspen man was killed just before 5pm in the westbound lanes. His name has not yet been released.

Marci Krivonen

Aspen and Snowmass Village have played host before to the USA Pro Challenge but, for the first time this year, the race will travel through Basalt and Carbondale. Cyclists begin “stage two” of the race in Aspen just after 10 o’clock Tuesday morning. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, Downvalley communities are rolling out the red carpet.

Marci Krivonen

The Bud is back. Basalt’s successful international tea company is once again called Two Leaves and a Bud. A couple years ago the company shortened its name to Two Leaves Tea Company.  They heard from many customers about that and, last month the bud returned. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Tea company founder Richard Rosenfeld takes the blame for shortening the company’s name. He thought the original name - Two Leaves and a Bud - was too long. It didn’t take long for customers to respond.

Lynn Waldorf

The number of women who are hunting and fishing is growing and in some years is outpacing the number of men who receive hunting licenses.  This trend hasn’t been missed by Colorado’s Division of Parks and Wildlife which relies heavily on license sales to fund its management of wild lands.  Earlier this week, Parks and Wildlife hosted a free hunting and fishing clinic for women in Basalt.  Dorothy Atkins went along and filed this report.

Aspen Valley Foundation

The non-profit Aspen Valley Foundation is all but obsolete except for one remaining initiative: a retirement facility in Basalt. The Foundation this year, ran out of money for the grants it traditionally awards local non profits. But, members of the Foundation’s board say they’re committed to moving forward a so-called continuing care retirement community. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Marci Krivonen

Next week voters in the sprawling, mid-valley Crown Mountain Park and Recreation District will head to the polls. Four people are running for three open seats on the board of directors. Three of them are incumbents and the fourth jumped in after voters turned down a proposal last fall, to build a recreation center. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

It’s a cloudy, chilly day as Ted Bristol drives me through the 130-acre Crown Mountain Park in El Jebel. Despite the light snowfall, some bundled-up dog waters are braving the cold.

Marci Krivonen

If you’ve driven through downtown Basalt recently, it’s hard to miss the mess of trees, electrical boxes and garbage covering a central stretch of land. It’s the site of the old Pan and Fork Mobile Home park, where more than 300 people used to live. The Town of Basalt helped those residents relocate and now it’s focusing on redeveloping the five acres. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen walked through the area with Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

http://www.flyfishingconnection.com/

The Roaring Fork Conservancy is taking a look at what a healthy Fryingpan River means to the local economy. The Fryingpan Valley Economic Study is underway and will continue into next year according to the Basalt based organization. The group says the study aims to understand visitor use and spending related to recreational activities on the Lower Fryingpan River and Ruedi Reservoir, and the river’s economic importance. The final result will give people an idea of what a healthy river means to the local economy. The Conservancy believes the report will also aid in helping to keep the river healthy. Colorado State University and Colorado Mountain College are assisting with the study that is funded in part by the town of Basalt, Eagle County, the Aspen Skiing Company Environment Foundation and other private donors. Over a decade ago the Conservancy conducted a similar study and found the Fryingpan Valley's recreational activities contributed an estimated $1.8 million annually in total economic output to Basalt's economy. Updated numbers are expected to be greater.

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