Basalt

Downtown Business A Concern Ahead of Basalt Election

Mar 24, 2014
www.basalt.net

Basalt’s municipal election is about one week away and five candidates are vying for three open seats on the Town board. One of the biggest issues is business. While downtown stores struggle, the new urban Willits area is busy. Mike Scanlon is Basalt’s Town Manager.

www.ourtownplanning.org

The Town of Basalt’s halfway through its unconventional urban planning process. In February, Town officials invited residents to participate in what they’re calling the “Our Town” process, where they lay out a map of downtown and ask people what they’d like to see there. So far, more than 300 people have offered up ideas. They’re zeroing in on a 12 acre chunk of public-private land that runs from Old Pond Park to Basalt Grocery and the Aspenalt Lodge. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen spoke to Basalt Town Manager Mike Scanlon.

RMI Planning to Build "Deep Green" Building in Basalt

Feb 17, 2014
Rocky Mountain Institute

The non profit Rocky Mountain Institute is moving forward with plans to build an “Innovation Center” in downtown Basalt. The organization submitted a sketch plan to Town Council last month and if council supports it, construction could start in the fall. RMI specializes in sustainability and energy efficiency and the structure near the Roaring Fork River, will be highly efficient. The $15 million building will be double the size of the group’s current headquarters in Old Snowmass.

Basalt Prepares To Plant Urban, Edible Food Forest

Feb 11, 2014
Town of Basalt

Even though snow is ankle deep and winter’s far from over, gardeners in Basalt are gearing up for spring. This year, it’ll be hard to miss a new project just off Highway 82. A Town park will be transformed into a food forest or, an edible, urban garden. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

"We are ready to go!"

Lisa DiNardo is the Town of Basalt’s Horticulturist. She’s in charge of beautifying Basalt’s public spaces and this year, there’s a new challenge: a food forest bordering the round-about at the entrance to Old Town.

Mountain Edition - January 30th, 2014

Jan 30, 2014

With just eight days until the Olympics start in Sochi...the Aspen community sends off four local athletes who will compete.

Health care prices in the Valley have been rising for years. Now, a handful of local employers are trying to improve worker’s health--and bring down costs.

Basalt’s setting a path for its future...in a non-traditional way. It’s using a method called “crowd-sourcing” to gather input on urban planning.

A new group in Aspen wants to make it easier for young people to stay in Aspen. City council approved the Next Generation Advisory Commission this week.

And, as Colorado’s population grows, the state’s water supply can’t keep up. A Basalt organization is involved in a statewide water plan.

Terrain parks are ubiquitous at ski resorts around the country. Now, there’s an effort to make them safer.

Finally, Aspen’s Torin Yater-Wallace is heading to the Olympics. The freeskier is recovering from injuries...but, says he’s ready to compete.

Valley Roundup - January 24th, 2014

Jan 24, 2014

Good afternoon and welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the week’s top news stories in Aspen and beyond.

We are joined today by Carolyn Sackariason, Editor of the Aspen Daily News, Andy Stone, a columnist fro and former editor of the Aspen Times and Michael Miracle, Editor of Aspen Sojourner magazine.

The X Games are upon us and the word is that ESPN will continue them in Aspen for another five years.  The games bring a younger crowd to town.  Today we consider what Aspen looks like to a 20-something visitor.

Basalt is organizing a crowd-sourcing urban planning process.  The town wants residents to look ahead and imagine a future town.

Aspen will soon have an empty art museum to repurpose and the ideas for the space are rolling in.  The city wants a public service that will engage the community.

And on the Download with Rob St. Mary - Netflix could be ready to press subscribers into the battle over net neutrality.

Marijuana Greenhouse Breaks Ground near Basalt

Jan 7, 2014
Marci Krivonen

Construction equipment is moving dirt in the Mid-Valley in preparation for a marijuana grow site. The medical marijuana business Silverpeak Apothecary is constructing a 25,000 foot greenhouse to supply both medical and retail marijuana to its storefront in Aspen. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, the owners broke ground Friday despite complaints from neighbors.

Mountain Edition - December 5th, 2013

Dec 5, 2013

A whopper of a snowstorm dumped more than a foot of white gold along the Roaring Fork Valley.

The Town of Basalt is facing angry residents who don’t want to be forced out of their homes.

South of Carbondale, citizen scientists are using backpacks to get more data on air pollution

And other residents there are grappling with more layoffs at the Elk Creek coal mine. It’s been all but closed up.

A New Castle native is hoping to overcome a big injury and make it to the Winter Olympics.

And we’ll hear from a seasoned athlete about what it’s like to compete in the Olympics and take home a medal.

Marci Krivonen

Some Basalt families are angry about being removed from their homes. The relocation is part of an effort to get residents out of a flood plain and restore the Roaring Fork River. Now, frustrated residents are meeting directly with town officials. The Town of Basalt is holding a meeting next week with a committee called Workers for Justice and Diversity in Basalt. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Mountain Edition - November 14th, 2013

Nov 14, 2013

Energy planners gathered in Carbondale this week to compare notes and strategize about funding.

The Town of Basalt approves a home for senior citizens. Now, there’s an effort underway to recruit residents.

Snowmass Village takes a stab at cutting greenhouse gas emissions. The town has some of the highest per capita in the nation.

An independent study finds the Roaring Fork Valley’s mass transit system means big savings for residents.

We find out whether Lance Armstrong had anything to do with death threats against the national agency to prevent doping.

We’ll wrap up with the latest from our Road to Sochi series. Olympic hopeful Meg Olenick aims to be one of the first compete in a sport new to the winter games.

Design Workshop

Now that the Basalt Town Board has green-lighted a senior housing facility, marketing efforts to reach area seniors will ramp up. The non-profit behind the Continuing Care Retirement Community wants to start building in 2015. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Mountain Edition - November 7th, 2013

Nov 7, 2013

On Tuesday, most voters said “no” to big tax increases locally and statewide. A CSU political science professor says anti-tax activists are growing in their influence.

One measure that did pass taxes retail marijuana to raise money for schools. As pot becomes more available in the state, one youth non-profit is worried.

A warming climate is changing ecosystems in the Roaring Fork Valley and one local government is using open spaces to gather data on what’s happening.

A new art display at the Wyly Art Center in Basalt features the work of a self-taught painter.  Despite being silenced by Alzheimer’s, Winifred Wyman is speaking through paint.

Also today on the Road to Sochi, Aspen native Simi Hamilton works to make the 2014 winter Olympic team. The Nordic ski racer specializes in sprinting.

That’s coming up on Mountain Edition.

Marci Krivonen

As mobile homes make way for a public park in Basalt, some say a non profit organization has broken promises about how it would help residents. More than 200 people in the flood-prone Pan and Fork Mobile Home park now have to move or get ready to, as riverfront work starts there. One resident Adriana Torres, says years ago, the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation, or CDC talked about relocating the residents.

Ballot Issues 4C and 4D - the proposed Crown Mountain Recreation Center in the mid valley. Amy Conrardi, board member of the Crown Mountain Rec Center and a proponent of the center. Katie Schwoerer, former Basalt City Council member, is on the issue committee No on 4C/4D will discuss the center.

Mountain Edition - October 24th, 2013

Oct 24, 2013

It’s election time and we’re taking a look at issues on the November ballot and what they could mean for a voter’s tax bill. First, there’s a statewide income tax increase for public schools.

And, there’s a local proposal to build a rec center in the Mid-Valley. Supporters say will enhance the community, while critics say it would mean hundreds more in property taxes for homeowners.

Basalt residents are being asked to redevelop land along the Roaring Fork River. The plan forces out more than a hundred people from a trailer park.

Finally, we’ll hear the latest weather forecast for the coming winter… there’s good news, and bad news.

discoveryspringtexas.com

 We’ve reported this week, starting Monday October 21st, on the various tax increases proposed in measures in next month’s election.  If all of them and Amendment 66 pass it could be one of the most expensive recent elections for many mid-valley voters.  The question is how expensive

Mid-Valley Recreation Center?

Oct 21, 2013
Crown Mountain Recreation District

  This week we are looking at the various tax increase questions before voters next month.  One of the largest projects in the valley seeking voter approval is the proposed recreation center in Basalt.  The indoor facility would be built in the Crown Mountain Park. Aspen Public Radio's Roger Adams reports.

“For me, I think it’s a great amenity, I think its an amenity for everyone who lives here and I think it’s the next step in the progression of any community.”

Mountain Edition - August 29th, 2013

Aug 30, 2013

The U.S. Department of Justice has announced it won’t try and stop Colorado and Washington State from allowing recreational marijuana.

Basalt officials say they’re on track to move nearly forty families living in a trailer park. It’s part of a redevelopment plan… and some of the families say they can’t afford to stay in Basalt.

We’ll find out what the reaction in Aspen was to the USA Pro Challenge, which took over parts of the Upper Valley last week.

And, what the latest is on what cycling officials are doing to catch doping… turns out they don’t necessarily agree with each other.

A Glenwood Springs teacher is teaming up with NOAA to chart the ocean floor. She sets sail early next month.

An accomplished local author is taking readers across the world. Her latest novel will be published soon. It chronicles an early feminist in the 19th century Ottoman Empire.

And, The Colorado State Fair continues in Pueblo through the weekend… we have an audio postcard.

Farther down valley, the Basalt Police Department is still trying to reach someone who may have been one of the last people to see a man who died in Basalt last month. Daniel Perez Mejia was found in late May in a ditch near Big O Tires in Basalt. Police say Mejia got off a bus operated by the Roaring Fork Transit Authority late in the evening on Saturday, May 25th. There was another man who got off the bus at the same time.

Boosting Business in Basalt

May 16, 2013
Roger Adams

The apparent early success of Whole Foods Market in Basalt is drawing new attention to the Willits development.  Already some businesses have relocated to Willits from downtown Basalt as the foot traffic there grows.  For some this presents a challenge to downtown where merchants are brainstorming ways to attract more visitors their way.  Aspen Public Radio’s Roger Adams explains.

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