Business

Valley Roundup - October 24th, 2014

Oct 24, 2014

Welcome to Valley Roundup, a review of the top news stories in the valley in the past week.

This week - Development is booming up and down the valley. A new hot springs in Glenwood Springs, a new hotel in Basalt and a big new bus depot in Aspen are just some of the upcoming projects. 

There is a demonstrated need for more psychiatric care in the Valley.  Officials say too many drunks and people with mental health problems wind up in jail or the ER.

Also this week newspaper endorsements and their effect on voters.

And, remembering Willard Clapper.

Marci Krivonen

Aspen and Snowmass Village have played host before to the USA Pro Challenge but, for the first time this year, the race will travel through Basalt and Carbondale. Cyclists begin “stage two” of the race in Aspen just after 10 o’clock Tuesday morning. As Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports, Downvalley communities are rolling out the red carpet.

Marci Krivonen

The Bud is back. Basalt’s successful international tea company is once again called Two Leaves and a Bud. A couple years ago the company shortened its name to Two Leaves Tea Company.  They heard from many customers about that and, last month the bud returned. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen explains.

Tea company founder Richard Rosenfeld takes the blame for shortening the company’s name. He thought the original name - Two Leaves and a Bud - was too long. It didn’t take long for customers to respond.

Marci Krivonen

As the craft beer movement grows in the United States, breweries are working to set themselves apart and offer something different. Many are experimenting with new kinds of beer, offering up so-called “sour” and “wild” varieties. A new brewery in Glenwood Springs is specializing in this avant-garde beer. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen toured Casey Brewing and Blending and filed this report.

Casey Brewing and Blending sits on a steep hill above the Roaring Fork River. Inside a warehouse space, lots of used oak wine barrels are stacked high.

Afternoon of Conversation

* PepsiCo Chairperson and CEO Indra Nooyi in conversation with David Bradley

* Former Vice President Al Gore with David Gergen

* Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair in conversation with Andrea Mitchell

* The Race Card Project with NPR’s Michele Norris and Guests

* Gen. David Petraeus (Ret., US Army) in conversation with Bob Schieffer

Airbnb: How the Sharing Economy is Redefining the Marketplace and Our Sense of Community

Airbnb does business in 34,000 cities, has a valuation of over 10 billion dollars, and in a very short time has disrupted the world of hospitality and travel. Its co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky envisions the future city as a place where sharing is front and center — where people become micro-entrepreneurs, the local mom and pops will flourish once again, where space isn’t wasted, but shared, and more of almost everything is produced, except waste. But the journey from here to there won’t be all smooth sailing. What are the ups and downs of the sharing economy, as businesses like Airbnb confront critiques about regulation, economic development, and fairness? What role might businesses play in creating more shareable, more livable cities? How will the sharing economy, with its de-emphasis on ownership, be a tool for addressing urban inequality?

Brian Chesky, Jennifer Bradley

Marci Krivonen

Summer in Aspen not only means warm weather and crowds, it also means businesses are hiring. The resort has a seasonal economy and, some companies are reviewing their drug and alcohol policies now that marijuana is legal in Colorado. It's causing some confusion for employers and raising questions for human resources departments. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Since marijuana became legal for adults in Colorado, Alicia Miller has been getting a lot of questions from employees at Aspen Valley Hospital.

http://ventureburn.com/

The future of rural broadband in the Rockies is being discussed this week in Vail. The Mountain Connect Rural Broadband Conference seeks to bring together stakeholders to talk about ways of improving service. Christopher Mitchell is with the Institute for Local Self-Reliance based in Minnesota. He is attending the conference. Mitchell spoke recently to Aspen Public Radio’s Rob St. Mary about how co-ops could help improve broadband service in the rural West.

A neighboring county is grappling with a huge mudslide, west of the Roaring Fork Valley.

It’s so dangerous a search for three missing residents has been called off and another slide could come down.

Construction begins in Carbondale for a decorative new roundabout on highway 133.

We’ll hear different opinions about a federal plan to beef up environmental protection for certain bodies of water.

Some Colorado companies are starting to use the state’s new logo but there have been hiccups for the branding effort.

Finally, we’ll hear from a state representative whose district covers Pitkin County about her busy time at the Statehouse.

That’s all coming up on Mountain Edition – right now.

Flickr/Libby Levi/opensource.com

This month, we’ve been examining what it takes to live and work in Aspen, and whether the middle class is being priced out. Today we focus on young entrepreneurs and the barriers they face when opening a business in Aspen. For some the high rents and seasonal business is worth it, while others were forced to move Downvalley to make it work, financially. Aspen Public Radio’s Marci Krivonen reports.

Bo Gallagher, 24, switches on a large dryer in his silk-screening store, Zapazoo Inkworks. Unlike a clothes dryer, this machine has a wide conveyer belt.

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