Three information kiosks will be stationed at the Launchpad, The Third Street Center, and later at The Village Smithy today. More will be installed next year.


The stations will provide information about creative businesses and hotels, as well as local events. It’s part of an effort to promote Carbondale’s Creative District. It’s a state designation that helps fund and support creative economies.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

After a month of interviewing candidates over the last month, Carbondale’s Creative District Governance Council has been formed.

Sloan Shoemaker, Executive Director of Wilderness Workshop, and Will Roush, Conservation Director of Wilderness Workshop, discuss the organization's role in conserving and protecting public lands today and what the future holds. Challenges include overpopulation and climate change, but the Workshop remains optimistic.

Visit for more information and links to events and membership. 

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Corey Simpson became the executive artistic director of Carbondale’s Thunder River Theatre Company this past summer. Since then he’s had to wear many hats. The group is producing their first play of the season, ‘Jekyll and Hyde’.

Carbondale Clay Center

 The Carbondale Clay Center was awarded a grant from Colorado Creative Industries Wednesday.

The $6,500 grant will be used for operational expenses for year round programming.

The center’s executive director Angela Bruno said the nonprofit hopes to expand programming in Carbondale’s Creative District.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

The search for members of a governance council that will lead Carbondale’s Creative District is continuing this week.

School representatives and members of local arts groups will discuss how Carbondale’s Creative District status and the school’s curriculum can be more in sync on Thursday.


The collaboration won’t begin for another year, but Koenigsknecht hopes to include a framework of project-based learning, where students learn through individual projects.


Crystal River Elementary’s principal, Matt Koenigsknecht, said the goal of this meeting is to come up with a cohesive vision for how the students might be learning.

Courtesy Photo

More than two decades ago, Rennie Harris started a dance company to try to eliminate negative stereotypes about rap and hip-hop. Now, Harris has multiple companies, and is bringing his Denver-based Grass Roots Project to Carbondale this weekend. Harris spoke with Aspen Public Radio’s Patrick Fort about how he talks about race through dance.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Since Carbondale became a certified Creative District earlier this summer, there have been lots of concrete changes to the town. There are signs pointing towards creative business like galleries and restaurants. Coming soon are iPads placed around town to help people find out more about the Creative District.

Courtesy photo

The 5Point adventure film festival is bringing their movies outside next Thursday in Carbondale.


“Road from Karakol”, which premiered at the 5Point Film Festival in 2013, is being shown.


The event features some of the highlights from the nonprofit’s four events in Minnesota, North Carolina, Washington state and here in Carbondale.

Roaring Fork Mountain Association, or RFMBA, Executive Director Mike Pritchard shares the organization's trail projects and how they benefit more than just mountain bikers in the Roaring Fork Valley. RFMBA Board Vice President, Todd Fugate, also contributes.

Visit to learn more about the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association and past, current , and future trail building projects.

Jess Worley is a Carbondale resident who grew up going to Mountain Fair. As she grew up, she learned to play bluegrass guitar. In 2010, her father, Bill “Willy” Worley, disappeared in the mountains near Redstone, and he was never seen again.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

Carbondale is officially a Colorado Creative District. The announcement came yesterday. The town joins 12 existing creative districts in the state.

Patrick Fort / Aspen Public Radio

As the craft brewing scene gets more crowded, entrepreneurs are getting into the distilling business. Last year, Connie Baker and her husband got into the act.

Public art is becoming more popular in communities throughout the country. And in the next two weeks, more than a dozen pieces are going up in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Courtesy, Renee Ramge

Over a dozen acts will be performing at July’s Mountain Fair in Carbondale.

On this week’s Mountain Edition, hosts Alycin Bektesh and Elise Thatcher present a compilation of the week’s news.


Topics include:

- The end of the Colorado legislative session

- The future of Aspen’s free-market residential development

- A changing of the guard in Carbondale

- Edible marijuana manufacturing

Carbondale hosted the 2016 Colorado Creative Industries Summit last week. The annual event brought more than 300 people from creative fields to the town. Last year’s event was held in Fort Collins.

Carbondale is getting a little more creative this week. The town’s application to become a certified creative district is in the hands of Colorado Creative Industries, the state organization in charge of the program.

As Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot plans to step down on May 11, mayor pro tem Dan Richardson will take her seat.

But with the political upheaval happening right as Carbondale hosts the Colorado Creative Industries Summit on Thursday, the change could affect the town’s effort to become a certified creative district.


Amy Kimberly, with the Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities, said there is no concern about how this change might affect her efforts to reach the certification.